Tag Archives: Police

Peru’s ex-leader commits suicide during police raid

Former Peruvian president Alan Garcia

Former Peruvian president Alan García shot himself in the head during arrest 

Peru’s ex-president Alan García committed suicide on Wednesday after police arrived at his house in Lima to arrest him in connection with a bribery investigation.

When the authorities arrived at the home of the former leftist president, with an arrest warrant, García locked himself into his bedroom, shot himself and was rushed to a hospital, his personal secretary told reporters.

According to CBC News, members of once-powerful Apra party announced the 69-year-old’s death to crowds gathered outside of hospital Casimiro Ulloa, where he underwent emergency surgery. Health Minister Zulema Tomas said he suffered three cardiac arrests after being admitted.

Police stand guard outside a hospital where Peru’s former President Alan Garcia was taken after he shot himself, in Lima, Peru, on April 17, 2019. REUTERS/Guadalupe Pardo

Supporters of Garcia expressed shock and anger following news of his death.

A line of officers in helmets and riot shields stood guard outside the hospital, keeping them at a distance.

President Martin Vizcarra, whom Garcia had blamed for the investigation, announced his death on Twitter. “Dismayed over the death of García,” he wrote. “I send my condolences to his family and loved ones.”

Reuters reports, García was one of nine people a judge ordered to be arrested on Wednesday in connection with an investigation into bribes distributed by Odebrecht, the Brazilian construction company that triggered Latin America’s biggest graft scandal when it admitted publicly in late 2016 that it had secured lucrative contracts across the region with bribes.

A skilled orator who led Peru’s once-powerful Apra party for decades, García governed as a nationalist from 1985 to 1990 before remaking himself as a free-market proponent and winning another five-year term in 2006.

He was hailed as “the president of hope.”

García had denied wrongdoing involving Odebrecht and blamed his legal troubles on political persecution.

“Others might sell out, not me,” García said in broadcast comments on Tuesday, repeating a phrase he has used frequently as his political foes became ensnared in the Odebrecht investigation.

García also denied the claims on Twitter saying that all accusations against him were speculation.

“I never sold myself,” he tweeted.

After police arrived at Garcia’s house to arrest him early on Wednesday, Garcia told them he had to call his attorney, Interior Minister Carlos Moran said.

“He entered a room and closed the door behind him,” Moran told a news conference shortly before Garcia’s death was confirmed. “Within a few minutes, a shot from a firearm was heard and police forcibly entered and found Mr. Garcia sitting with a wound in his head.”

Last year, García asked Uruguay for political asylum after he was banned from leaving the country to keep him from fleeing or obstructing the investigation. Uruguay rejected the request.

García would have been the third former president in Peru to have been jailed in the Odebrecht case. Ollanta Humala spent nine months in pre-trial detention in 2017-2018 and Pedro Pablo Kuczynski was arrested without charges last week.

A fourth former president, Alejandro Toledo, is fighting extradition from California after a judge in Peru ordered him jailed for 18 months in connection with Odebrecht in 2017.

All have denied wrongdoing in connection with Odebrecht.

Vizcarra ordered flags flown at half staff and declared a three-day national period of mourning for Garcia.

Garcia’s family members opted to break with protocol and not have Vizcarra or a government representative preside over his funeral, local media said.

Supporters of Peruvian ex-president Alan Garcia participate in a memorial service at the American Popular Revolutionary Alliance (APRA) party headquarter’s in the Andean city. (AFP / CRIS BOURONCLE)

On Wednesday night, his body was taken to a memorial service at his party’s headquarters, known as the “House of the People,” a blue colonial-style building where Garcia once celebrated his presidential victories.

Several men carried his wooden casket through a thick crowd of supporters chanting, “Alan! Alan!”

“He’s still with the people!” they cried out.

Police identify victims of triple homicide near Oneida Nation

Bodkin Road was closed to traffic in the area where three bodies were found in Middlesex Centre, Ont. (CTV London)

Three members of Six Nations found dead

The discovery of three bodies just outside the Oneida of the Thames First Nation has turned into a triple homicide investigation.

The two men and one woman found dead on Sunday in Middlesex Centre, near Bodkin Road and Jones Drive, were from Six Nations of the Grand River, a First Nations community near Brantford Ont.

Police were called to the area at 10 a.m. Sunday after reports of a grey truck in a field.

The OPP would not say whether the bodies were found inside the truck, or outside.

Police confirmed the identities of the deceased as 37-year-old Melissa Trudy Miller, 33-year-old Alan Grant Porter and 32-year-old Michael Shane Jamieson.

On Wednesday, multiple OPP K-9 searches were done in the area where the truck and bodies were found.

While police revealed the names and ages of the victims, nothing was said about the cause of the deaths and few other details are known.

However police have zeroed in on the grey 2006 Chevrolet Silverado pickup and are asking members of the public who may have seen the truck in the area of Bodkin Road prior to 10 a.m. on Nov 4th to contact them.

Police have released a generic photo of a grey 2006 Chevrolet Silverado, similar to the one OPP say was located with the bodies.

According to Global News, though the grisly discovery wasn’t made on Oneida Nation land, its Chief, Jessica Hill, has been in contact with Six Nations.

“We’re sending our condolences to the community of Six Nations, to the families there” she said.

“We’re hoping the individuals responsible will be brought to justice.”

The OPP has set up a hotline for tips related to the homicide investigation.

Anyone with information is asked to call a new police tipline at 1-844-677-5050, the Six Nations Police Service at 1519-445-2811 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Police have confirmed that the homicides are not being investigated in connection with any other cases.

Similar incident in 2017

The remains of 48-year-old Douglas Hill were found on Oneida land, in Aug 2017. He was last seen in Six Nations on June 24th. Hill’s death was considered a homicide.

The cause of his death has not been made public. Four people were charged in connection with the case including a 17-year-old girl. The charges were all dismissed last month.

No information is available as to why the prosecution ended.

By Black Power, RPM Staff

Man facing charges after fireworks discharged at Justice for Our Stolen Children camp

Teepees are seen at the Justice for Our Stolen Children camp near the Saskatchewan Legislative Building in Regina. June 27, 2018, THE CANADIAN PRESS

A man faces charges after fireworks were discharged towards the Justice for Our Stolen Children camp in Regina.

According to a news release, police were sent to the protest camp, located in Wascana Park at 2 a.m. on Sunday, after a man got out of a vehicle parked at the legislative building and discharged a Roman candle, which shot multiple flammable projectiles at the camp then fled in the vehicle.

Police said no one was injured as a result of the incident and the camp of teepees did not sustain any damage.

Twenty-five year-old Brent Holland, of Yorkton is charged with mischief under $5,000, uttering threats, assault with a weapon and arson with disregard for human life.

Holland was released from custody and will appear in provincial court in Regina on Sept. 17.

The camp has been set up in the park since late February to draw attention to racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children apprehended by child-welfare workers

Saskatchewan Premier wants Police to remove Justice for Our Stolen Children camp

The Justice for Our Stolen Children camp has grown to nine teepees.

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe is backing calls for police to remove teepees that protesters have set up on the legislature grounds, forcing changes to Canada Day plans.

Moe says there are laws that cover the park surrounding the provincial legislature to ensure that it’s available to everyone.

“The fact (is) that the protests that we do see across the way are breaking laws here, and those laws should be enforced,” Moe said Thursday.

The Justice for Our Stolen Children camp was set up to protest racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children apprehended by child-welfare workers.

The camp started in late February and was dismantled early last week before being set up again June 21 with more teepees.

Bylaws prohibit overnight camping, placement of structures and burning wood and other combustibles in the park.

The Provincial Capital Commission said on Wednesday that it has had to make alterations to its Canada Day festivities, because the space where the camp is situated normally has a concert stage and beer gardens.

Regina police have said there’s no need to step in at this point, because a meeting is scheduled for Monday between the protesters and five government ministers in the town of Fort Qu’Appelle.

Camp protester Robyn Pitawanakwat said Thursday that she thinks there are laws being broken by pushing out peaceful protests.

“There are charter rights that are being put in violation when that happens,” she said. “Breaking the law is not just one sided in this regard. Bylaws are very minor and charter rights supersede those.”

Moe said it’s the government’s expectation that the teepees will be removed either before or after the meeting. As of Thursday morning, there were nine teepees at the camp.

“We continue to work with First Nations leaders across the province on the issues that have been raised just here,” Moe said. “If the teepees are removed previous to that (meeting), that would be positive as well.”

Pitawanakwat said there needs to be a focus on justice before the teepees are removed.

“We need families coming home,” she said. “We need to have children put back in biological family settings that are open and willing to take them.”

Ryan McKenna, The Canadian Press

[SOURCE]

On Monday, police arrested six people from the teepee near the Saskatchewan Legislature in Regina.

FSIN outraged by Sask government, police handling of protest camp outside legislature

On Monday, police arrested six people from the teepee near the Saskatchewan Legislature in Regina.

On Monday, police arrested six people from the teepee near the Saskatchewan Legislature in Regina.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) says it is outraged by how the Saskatchewan government and police handled protests outside the provincial legislature.

Six people from the Justice for our Stolen Children camp were arrested on Monday as a teepee was removed from the site.

The camp was set up at the end of February shortly after the acquittals of Gerald Stanley in the fatal shooting of Colten Boushie and Raymond Cormier in the death of Manitoba teen Tina Fontaine. Both victims were Indigenous.

It protested racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children in government care.

“The current child-welfare system is failing and contributing to many of the social problems our children are forced to endure,” FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron said in a statement Tuesday.

“We call for respect and peace to rectify the provincial child-welfare system that is failing.”

Cameron said Indigenous communities know what’s best for their children and how to help them succeed in life.

The province had served notice that the camp would be shut down. Authorities evicted most people on Friday and those remaining were supposed to leave the site by noon Sunday.

Justice Minister Don Morgan said he didn’t want the removal of the camp to be a setback in the government’s relationship with First Nations.

Boushie’s mother, Debbie Baptiste, said the fight continues.

“We’re going to keep setting up our camps. We’re going to keep lighting our fires. We will not stop,” Baptiste said Monday.

“I’m not going to stop until change is made in the courtrooms, in the government.”

The Canadian Press

[SOURCE]