Tag Archives: police

Two windows are covered up Friday morning at the Enbridge building in Bemidji. Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the building. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

Bemidji Police Investigating Shots Fired At Enbridge Building, No One Hurt

Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the Enbridge’s Bemidji office. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidij Pioneer)

Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the Enbridge’s Bemidji office. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidij Pioneer)

Red Power Media | Feb 23, 2017

Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of Enbridge’s Bemidji office.

According to a news release from Enbridge’s communications supervisor Shannon Gustafson, Enbridge employees arrived at the building in Bemidji’s industrial park on Wednesday morning and discovered the shots.

No one was injured and police are investigating the incident as a drive-by shooting, Gustafson said.

Two windows are covered up Friday morning at the Enbridge building in Bemidji. Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the building. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

Two windows are covered up Friday morning at the Enbridge building in Bemidji. Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the building. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

Bemidji Chief of Police Mike Mastin said in a news release Thursday that the damage to the building appeared to have been caused by a shotgun and that the case remains under investigation.

“This incident was reckless and extremely dangerous,” Gustafson said in the release. “This criminal activity puts people at risk. Enbridge takes this activity very seriously and fully supports the prosecution of all of those involved.”

As of Thursday morning, the Enbridge office’s front windows were covered with black plastic and damage from a shotgun blast was visible.

Enbridge, a Canadian energy company, has been involved in a number of high-profile oil pipeline projects both locally and out of state. Enbridge is currently working to replace Line 3, a pipeline that runs from Alberta, Canada, through northern Minnesota to Superior, Wis. The company’s efforts have been met with opposition by local activists including Honor the Earth, a Native-led environmentalist group.

In August, Enbridge also announced an agreement to acquire an equity interest in the Bakken Pipeline System that includes two projects, one of which is the highly controversial Dakota Access Pipeline, the focus of a longstanding protest camp near Cannon Ball, N.D.

Pellet marks on a window frame at the Enbridge building in Bemidji. Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the building. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

Pellet marks on a window frame at the Enbridge building in Bemidji. Police are investigating after shots were fired at the front door and windows of the building. (Maggi Stivers | Bemidji Pioneer)

Honor the Earth founder Winona LaDuke said Thursday that the group has no idea who is responsible for firing the shots at the Bemidji office.

“We’d like a full investigation as to who would have shot up the front of the Enbridge office,” LaDuke said. “We certainly have no knowledge and don’t approve.”

SOURCE: Bemidji Pioneer

alain-juneau

Former SQ Officer Alain Juneau, Accused of Abuse of Aboriginals, Found Dead at Home

alain-juneau

Alain Juneau was facing charges dating back to the 1990s, when he was a Sûreté du Québec officer in the northern village of Schefferville, Que. (Radio-Canada)

Red Power Media | January 4, 2017

MONTREAL — The coroner’s office in Quebec confirmed Wednesday it is investigating the death of a retired officer recently charged with sexual assault in connection with an investigation into claims of abuse against indigenous women.

Alain Juneau, 56, died in his home Sunday in Rimouski, 300 kilometres northeast of Quebec City, coroner’s office spokeswoman Genevieve Guilbault said by email.

“His death is currently under investigation by a coroner and any information related to the probable cause and circumstances surrounding his death will be included in the coroner’s report, which will be made public in the coming months,” she said.

Juneau, a retired provincial police officer, was charged in November with sexual assault and assault, allegedly committed between 1992 and 1994 in Schefferville, a town on the Lower North Shore.

He was one of two retired officers charged after Montreal police concluded a high-profile investigation into claims that indigenous women in northern Quebec were abused by police.

Originally six provincial police officers in the northern town of Val-d’Or were accused of physically and sexually abusing indigenous women following an investigative report by Radio-Canada in 2015.

Quebec’s Public Security Department mandated the Montreal police force to investigate the allegations.

By April 2016, Montreal police had 38 cases of complaints of police abuse, including rape, sexual assault, harassment and so-called “starlight tours,” where police would allegedly take people against their will and drive them far outside town and abandon them.

In November, Crown prosecutors concluded there wasn’t enough evidence to charge any of the six provincial police officers originally accused, but brought charges against Juneau and another officer for alleged assault committed in a separate northern town.

Premier Philippe Couillard announced in December the creation of a provincial inquiry into relations between First Nations peoples and various government-run bodies, including the police.

Source: The Canadian Press

Thunder Bay police say no charges will be laid in connection with a December 2016 rally on Memorial Avenue in Thunder Bay in support of the Standing Rock environmental movement. (Jody Porter/CBC)

Thunder Bay Police Won’t Lay Charges in Local Standing Rock Demonstration

Thunder Bay police say no charges will be laid in connection with a December 2016 rally on Memorial Avenue in Thunder Bay in support of the Standing Rock environmental movement. (Jody Porter/CBC)

Thunder Bay police say no charges will be laid in connection with a December 2016 rally on Memorial Avenue in Thunder Bay in support of the Standing Rock environmental movement. (Jody Porter/CBC)

Police review found public safety maintained, disruption minimal

CBC News Posted: Dec 16, 2016

Thunder Bay police won’t lay charges against the organizers of and participants in a rally in support of the Standing Rock environmental movement that took place in the city.

The police service announced the decision in a written release Friday afternoon, after the completion of a review of the local demonstration.

More than 100 demonstrators carrying signs took over the intersection of Memorial Avenue and the Harbour Expressway in Thunder Bay, Ont. during the noon hour on Monday, Dec. 5.

In its release, Thunder Bay police said that “traffic flow in the area of the demonstration was managed by [police] officers to minimize disruptions for motorists.”

The force also described the rally as peaceful.

“Our primary concern was public safety,” said Insp. Dan Taddeo — the police commander at the demonstration site, and the person in charge of the review — was quoted as saying in Friday’s release.

“Steps were taken to ensure that no one was put in any danger as a result of the demonstration.”

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/thunder-bay-standing-rock-no-charges-1.3900861?cmp=abfb

War Chief Seven Bernard wasunarmed, outmanned and off the path of SWN’s injunction. Was any of this necessary? [Photo: Miles Howe] - Global Research

Non-Peaceful Pipeline Protests Will Be Met By Police And Military: Federal Minister

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Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr answers a question during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, May 17, 2016.

Non-peaceful pipeline protests will be met by police and military, federal minister Jim Carr tells Edmonton business leaders

Edmonton Sun | Published Dec 1, 2016

Two days after the federal government approved two major pipeline projects, two feelings are surfacing in Alberta’s business sector — elation that the approval has finally been given and concern that protests may keep the line from being built at all.

“We’ve already heard in these few short days since the announcement some voices raised saying this is going to be a hill for them to die on,” said Paul De Jong, president of the Progressive Contractors Association of Canada, at an Alberta Enterprise Group-sponsored breakfast with federal Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr at the Hotel Macdonald in Edmonton Thursday.

De Jong, who represents companies that employ thousands of people in the construction industry, alluded to comments made by Green Party Leader Elizabeth May that she would go to jail to keep the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline — one of two approved by the federal government Tuesday — from being built.

Not everyone is taking the protest comments seriously.

“Elizabeth May has declared war on common sense and Canadian unity,” said Ric McIver, interim leader of the Alberta PC party, following Carr’s speech.

“We can’t let the pipeline get held up by people that will never agree to any standard,” he added. “The law of the jungle cannot prevail.”

Carr fielded questions from business leaders about the potential for protest escalating to the kind of civil unrest seen recently at Standing Rock in North Dakota.

He said he welcomes peaceful dissent but draws the line at breaking the law.

“If people choose for their own reasons not to be peaceful, then the government of Canada, through its defence forces, through its police forces, will ensure that people will be kept safe,” he said to applause from the room. “We have a history of peaceful dialogue and dissent in Canada. I’m certainly hopeful that that tradition will continue. If people determine for their own reasons that that’s not the path they want to follow, then we live under the rule of law.”

De Jong was happy with that response but remains cautious.

“In Canada we have a long tradition of building major infrastructure projects like railways and highways under the rule of law where there’s a fair negotiation for access to land and the effect it has on communities,” he said. “Once those decisions are made, people fall in line and our workers have always been pleased to work in that kind of safe environment. We now see the possibility that perhaps some conditions may be different.”

He said the companies that he represents have not had to deal with major protests in the past but employees are told to put their own safety first and he expects no one to put themselves at risk to get a project done.

For now, Carr is welcoming conflicting views to come forward.

“These decisions are in the best interest of Canada. They are difficult and they are controversial,” he said. “Those who feel as if they have been, for their own reasons, treated badly by this decision, we welcome to hear from them still, to know that peaceful protest is part of our DNA as Canadians. We respect it, we honour it and we cherish it.”

[SOURCE]

Red Fawn Fallis.

Attempted Murder Charges Against Red Fawn Fallis Dropped, Now Facing Federal Charges

red-fawn

Red Fawn Fallis.

Red Fawn transferred from Morton County to Stutsman County, ND.

By Red Power Media, Staff | Nov 29, 2016 | Updated Dec 3, 2016

Attempted murder charges were dropped in a North Dakota courtroom Monday against Red Fawn Fallis, accused of firing a gun at police during a Dakota Access Pipeline protest.

Fallis, 37, from Denver, who faced 20 years is now facing federal charges instead.

According to The Bismarck Tribune, Fallis was charged in U.S. District Court for the District of North Dakota with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

The mandatory maximum sentence if convicted is 10 years in prison.

Either the U.S. attorney will seek a grand jury indictment against her within two weeks, or she will have a preliminary court hearing Dec. 12.

The attempted murder charges filed against Fallis in Morton County were dismissed because of the federal case, according to court records.

The federal complaint alleges that Fallis fired two shots toward officers while being arrested Oct. 27, as law enforcement cleared the northern “front line” camp on N.D. Highway 1806.

According to the complaint, Fallis later told law enforcement she was trying to pull the gun out of her pocket and it went off when deputies jumped her.

Vice News reports, Police allege she resisted arrest by tucking her arms under her body, and in the struggle that ensued, they heard two gunshots ring out, and saw the ground near one officer’s left knee “explode.” Officers say they grabbed a gun from her left hand and handcuffed her.

She did not have the gun in her hand when police took her down, the affidavit states. But they believe she was able to get the gun when the officer let go of her left arm.

None of the officers said they saw her pull the trigger. One officer said in his affidavit that two shots were fired, while another said that three shots were.

On Monday, the U.S. government asked for Fallis to be held in detention, which she did not contest. A date for a bail hearing has not been set.

As Fallis faced the judge, Dakota Access Pipeline Protesters marched around the block of the Morton County Courthouse in Mandan chanting “Free Red Dawn.”

According to the Facebook page Free RedFawn, she has been transferred from Morton County to Stutsman County, ND.

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A banner declaring “Free Red Fawn” hangs at a protest camp against the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock, North Dakota. (Photo: Red Power Media)

Supporters have advocated on Fallis’ behalf since her arrest. Some have also suggested that Fallis was targeted by police. On social media her supporters are using the hashtag #FreeRedFawn. Standing Rock camps have rallied behind her as well. Large painted banners declaring “Free Red Fawn” hang throughout the camp.

Fallis still has open misdemeanor cases in Morton County, including three separate incidents in which she is charged with disorderly conduct, criminal trespass and maintaining a public nuisance in connection with pipeline protests.

If you’d like to learn more about Red Fawn Fallis and her defense please visit: https://www.generosity.com/fundraising/free-red-fawn 

You can also send Red Fawn money via inmatecanteen.com Stutsman County or a message of support via the inmate message line at (701)2512365.

Lastly you can write to her at:
Red Fawn Fallis
Stutsman County Correctional Center
205 6th st. SE, Ste 201
Jamestown, ND 58401

#FreeRedFawn

Red Fawn Fallis.

Family says Red Fawn Fallis, Innocent of Attempted Murder on Police at ND Pipeline Protest

The family of Red Fawn Fallis, the woman arrested during the Dakota Access Pipeline protests demand her release and say she is not guilty of all charges: Mark Boyle Denver7/Facebook

The family of Red Fawn Fallis, the woman arrested during the Dakota Access Pipeline protests demand her release and say she is not guilty of all charges: Mark Boyle Denver7 /Facebook

By Red Power Media, Staff | Nov 07, 2016

Red Fawn Fallis, was arrested along with 140 other protesters on Oct. 27, near the Standing Rocking Sioux reservation in North Dakota. When police closed in during a mass arrest to remove water protectors from private property, Fallis, allegedly pulled out a .38 revolver and fired at officers.

Fallis, a 37yr old, Native American woman from Denver, is being held at the Morton County jail on a $100,000 bond. Police claim she had a concealed gun and fired twice towards two Minnesota police officerswho were working at the Dakota Access pipeline protests.

Fallis, was formally charged with attempted murder of an officer on Oct 31.

The charge, could result in a 20-year prison sentence.

On Monday, her family spoke out for the first time since the incident.

According to the Denver Post, the family of Fallis said she didn’t have a gun and the officers, who considered her an instigator, unjustly targeted her for arrest.

“There is no evidence there was a gun,” said Glenn Morris, a leader in the American Indian Movement of Colorado, during a Monday morning news conference.

According to her arrest affidavit, the deputies were going to arrest Fallis because she was “being an instigator and acting disorderly.”

She struggled and they brought her to the ground. While they were trying to cuff her, two shots were fired. A deputy saw the gun in Fallis’ left hand and wrestled the gun away from her, according to the affidavit.

Fallis, an Oglala Lakota Sioux, is a American Indian Movement member with roots in the organization.

The family has a strong tradition of fighting for the rights of American Indians, Morris said.

Loma Star Cleveland, who is the little sister of Red Fawn Fallis, joins others at press conference, at 4 Winds American Indian Council in Denver, to show support for Red Fawn, a Denver Native American woman arrested during pipeline protest in North Dakota, November 07, 2016. Red Fawn Fallis remains in jail in North Dakota after being arrested.

Loma Star Cleveland, who is the little sister of Red Fawn Fallis, joins others at press conference, at 4 Winds American Indian Council in Denver, to show support for Red Fawn, a Denver Native American woman arrested during pipeline protest in North Dakota, November 07, 2016.

Troy Lynn Yellow Wood, Fallis’ mother, was a member of the American Indian advocacy group AIM since the late 1970s and was at the group’s 1973 occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota.

Yellow Wood died a few weeks ago, said Loma Cleveland, Fallis’ younger sister.

Fallis has told her family not to worry because she is innocent, Cleveland said.

According to the Guardian, on Oct 22, when police arrested more than 120 people protesting against the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, Lauren Howland, was caught in the middle of the violence and chaos, and suffered a broken wrist when, she said, an officer attacked her.

Fallis, known as a mother to many of the youth at the Standing Rock protest, “personally came back into the frontlines and wheeled us all out”, Howland, 21, recalled. “She’s a protector.”

Supporters said she made a point of reminding youth activists to stay “peaceful and prayerful” and never resort to violence. She had a four-wheeler vehicle and often helped rescue protesters who needed medical attention during police confrontations.

Lauren Howland, with broken wrist suffered at the pipeline protest. Photograph: Sam Levin for the Guardian

Lauren Howland, with broken wrist suffered at the pipeline protest. Photograph: Sam Levin for the Guardian

Howland and other youth protesters said they were devastated to find out a week later that local police had arrested Fallis and charged her with attempted murder.

“Red Fawn has continually supported the youth council since its inception and is responsible for personally rescuing many of our members from the front lines after being brutalized by police.” – International Indigenous Youth Council

Fallis has been involved in the fight against the oil pipeline, which would run beneath the Missouri river near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, since demonstrations began.

Members of the tribe say the pipeline’s construction would trample on sacred lands, destroy artifacts and potentially poison waterways, including the Missouri river and Lake Oahe.

Since an escalating series of recent clashes between law enforcement and water protectors, the Morton County sheriff’s office has held up the charges against Fallis, as an example of what it says is the violent and illegal behavior of Native American protesters.

To some pipeline protesters, who described Fallis as a passionate activist dedicated to peaceful tactics, her detention is the latest sign that North Dakota police are aggressively targeting a growing movement and will go to great lengths to protect a powerful corporation threatening sacred tribal lands.

Red Fawn Fallis. ‘It doesn’t surprise me that they are targeting Red Fawn, because she’s definitely an asset to our community,’ said protester Eryn Wise. Photograph: Courtesy of Eryn Wise

Red Fawn Fallis. Photograph: Courtesy of Eryn Wise

On the same day the Morton County Sheriff’s Department announced the charges against Fallis, officials also stated Kyle Thompson, a contractor with the North Dakota Access pipeline company, would not face charges after being detained with an assault rifle.

Thompson was caught on video holding the rifle during an altercation with demonstrators.

RELATED:

The Morton County Sheriff’s Department said Thompson may have been the victim in the incident and an investigation is ongoing.

Fallis is the first demonstrator to be charged with an offense linked to the use of a firearm. In addition to the attempted murder charge, she is also facing one count of preventing arrest, a count of carrying a concealed weapon and a count of possession of marijuana.

Fallis’ family and supporters say the charges against her are false and she was picked out of a crowd because of her strong personality and opinions about water protection.

“They recognized her leadership as a young, indigenous woman who a lot of younger indigenous people looked to for example in leadership. So that identifies her as a target in their mind, I believe,”- Glenn Morris, AIM Colorado

On social media, many have supported Fallis with the hashtag #FreeRedFawn and some have compared her to Leonard Peltier, a native activist and former member of the American Indian Movement who was convicted of aiding in the killing of two FBI agents in 1975.

Red Fawn Fallis, remains in Morton County jail, as her family asks for support and, ultimately for her release.

Another Tear Gas Standoff With Police As Water Protectors Defend Sacred Land (Photo by Unicorn Riot, the Dakota Access Pipeline)

Another Tear Gas Standoff With Police As Water Protectors Defend Sacred Land

"We need sincere action in order to stop this pipeline," said Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network. (Photo: Peg Hunter/flickr/cc)(Photo: Peg Hunter/flickr/cc)

“We need sincere action in order to stop this pipeline,” said Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network. (Photo: Peg Hunter/flickr/cc)(Photo: Peg Hunter/flickr/cc)

Latest incident comes as reporting shows pipeline company failed to immediately inform state regulators it found artifacts during construction

by Andrea Germanos, staff writer | Common Dreams

Water protectors near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation continued to face violence and intimidation on Sunday, with police again firing tear gas as they attempted to defend their sacred ground.

According to reporting by Unicorn Riot, the Dakota Access Pipeline foes “crossed the Cantapeta Creek (an offshoot of the Cannonball river) to set up camp on the land formation now referred to as ‘Turtle Island.'” Both the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Standing Rock Sioux lay claim to that land.

Video documentation by Unicorn Riot and photos on Twitter by those on the scene show a row of police on top the hill above where the water protectors had cross onto the island. The video footage shows tear gas landing near the protesters.

#NoDAPL Water Protectors Tear Gassed by Police During Attempt to Reclaim Sacred Burial Site from Unicorn Riot on Vimeo.

An image captured by film director and environmental activist Josh Fox shows one protester holding up a mirror to reflect back the brutality of the police tactics.

The creek is the same site where just days earlier another violent standoff took place between police and water protectors. One journalist was shot by police with a rubber bullet during that incident while she was conducting an interview.

The latest militarized police response to the protesters comes as North Dakota regulators are set to file a complaint against pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners “for failing to disclose the discovery of Native American artifacts in the path of construction,” the Guardian reported Saturday. The reporting continued:

The allegations mark the state’s first formal action against the corporation and add fuel to the claims of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has long argued that the $3.7bn pipeline threatens sacred lands and indigenous cultural heritage.

Julie Fedorchak, chair of the North Dakota public service commission, told the Guardian that on 17 October, pipeline officials found a group of stone cairns –symbolic rock piles that sometimes mark burial grounds – on a site where construction was planned.

The firm, however, failed to notify the commission, in violation of its permit, and only disclosed the findings 10 days later when government workers inquired about it, she said.

The standoff also comes a day after Steve Horn reported that

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has confirmed to DeSmog that Energy Transfer Partners, the owner of the proposed Dakota Access pipeline, has ignored the Obama administration’s September 9 request to voluntarily halt construction in a disputed area, 20 miles east and west of Lake Oahe and the Missouri River.

Further, as Common Dreams reported last week,

An independent pipeline expert [commission by the Standing Rock Sioux] has concluded that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ environmental assessment (EA) of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) is insufficient and fails to account for the impact on tribal members, prompting the Standing Rock Sioux to demand that the federal agency “revisit” its approval of the controversial project.

With the feeling by some that now “time is running out,” native leaders are calling for a thousands-strong mobilization on Nov. 15 to take place at Army Corps of Engineers offices across the country.

“This is a call for all of our relatives who’ve been wanting to support,” said Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network in a media statement. “Whether you’ve come to the camp, whether you haven’t come to the camp. If you live near an Army Corps of Engineers office, we’re asking you to step up to mobilize. We’re asking you to come out in numbers and not only let the Army Corps of Engineers hear your voices, but let the Obama Administration hear your voice.”

“We need sincere action in order to stop this pipeline,” he continued.

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2016/11/07/another-tear-gas-standoff-police-water-protectors-defend-sacred-land

Madeline Lanaro, whose 12-year-old daughter Monica Jack was murdered in 1978, wipes away tears after the RCMP announced the arrest of Garry Taylor Handlen, in connection to her murder and that of Kathryn-Mary Herbert, during a news conference in Surrey, B.C. Dec 1, 2014.

Missing And Murdered Inquiry Will Lack Power To Compel Police Action

Madeline Lanaro, whose 12-year-old daughter Monica Jack was murdered in 1978, wipes away tears after the RCMP announced an arrest in connection to her murder and that of Kathryn-Mary Herbert, during a news conference in Surrey, B.C. December 1, 2014

Madeline Lanaro, whose 12-year-old daughter Monica Jack was murdered in 1978, wipes away tears after the RCMP announced the arrest of Garry Taylor Handlen, in connection to her murder and that of Kathryn-Mary Herbert, during a news conference in Surrey, B.C. Dec 1, 2014.

The Globe and Mail, Jul 21, 2016

The national inquiry into Canada’s missing and murdered indigenous women will not have the authority to make findings of police misconduct or compel law-enforcement agencies to reopen cold cases, according to a draft of the terms of reference.

The nine-page document, which the federal government circulated to the provinces and territories for review, says five people will be appointed to the commission, with one individual named chief commissioner.

Sources have told The Globe that the following individuals are on the draft list: B.C. provincial court judge Marion Buller; former Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) president Michèle Audette, who lost her bid to represent the Liberals in a Quebec riding in last fall’s federal election; Qajaq Robinson, a Nunavut-born civil litigation lawyer who speaks Inuktitut; Marilyn Poitras, a Métis law professor at the University of Saskatchewan; and a First Nations lawyer who served on the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.

Judge Buller, who became B.C.’s first female First Nations judge in 1994, is said to be a contender to lead the commission. The Globe attempted to contact her through the Office of the Chief Judge but the office said it had not been able to reach her.

Ottawa’s self-imposed timeline for the launch of the inquiry has been pushed back on several occasions while the provinces and territories study the proposed terms of reference.

The draft document, which is not dated and is watermarked “sensitive and confidential,” says the commissioners will investigate and report on “systemic causes of violence against indigenous women and girls in Canada, including underlying social, economic, cultural, institutional and historical causes.” The commission, which is mandated to produce interim and final reports, is directed to establish regional advisory bodies comprised of victims’ families and survivors of violence.

Ms. Audette said a government official approached her about a potential appointment to the commission, and said her understanding is that no final decisions have been made. Ms. Robinson declined to comment. Ms. Poitras said she had no information to provide, and the Ontario lawyer could not be reached. Carolyn Campbell, a spokeswoman for Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett, said her office would not comment on the list of potential commissioners or on the terms of reference.

The Liberal government has so far committed $40-million over two years to conduct the inquiry into Canada’s more than 1,181 missing and murdered indigenous women. Sources said Ottawa intends to dedicate further funding to help victims’ relatives navigate the police complaints process if they question the quality of an investigation.

The national inquiry will inevitably review policing – a key reason Ottawa is getting the provinces and territories to sign on to the terms of reference is to ensure matters outside federal jurisdiction, notably child welfare and provincial and municipal policing, are deemed to be squarely within the inquiry’s scope.

However, the draft terms of reference do not explicitly mandate the inquiry to delve into policing policies or practices. And contrary to the hopes of some victims’ relatives and indigenous leaders, the document does not give the commission the power to compel police forces to reopen cold cases, pursue particular investigative avenues or probe an officer’s alleged misconduct. There is no mention of the creation of an independent civilian body that would review specific investigations or police conduct – something NWAC called for in its preinquiry report to the federal government.

Instead, the draft mandate authorizes the commission to pass along to the “appropriate authorities” any information that may be used in the investigation or prosecution of a criminal offence. It also says commissioners can provide authorities with information they believe relates to misconduct. The commission is not authorized to make findings or recommendations of civil or criminal liability.

Several indigenous, feminist and front-line organizations have publicly criticized the draft terms of reference, which were leaked and posted online. A joint statement released Wednesday by various high-profile advocates, including from Amnesty International Canada and the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action, called the omission of an explicit reference to policing “shocking.” It also lamented the lack of an independent case-review process.

“This appears to be sending families back in a circle, to the same authorities with whom they were/are having problems to start with,” the statement says. “This risks putting the Commissioners in an untenable position as they will appear to be part of the problem, not the solution.”

[SOURCE]

MONCTON, N.B.: JUNE 5, 2014 -- A police officer approaches a house on Mountain Rd. during a manhunt for Justin Bourque in Moncton, New Brunswick, on Wednesday, June 5, 2014. 

Police Union In Winnipeg Say Attacks On Officers Can And Have Happened In Canada

Dallas police officers stand in a line near the site of shootings in downtown Dallas early Friday. (LM Otero/Associated Press)

Dallas police officers stand in a line near the site of shootings in downtown Dallas early Friday. (LM Otero/Associated Press)

‘They know it could happen here’: Police union in Winnipeg on reaction to Dallas shootings

This article was originally published by cbc.ca on Jul 08, 2016

Maurice Sabourin was shocked, sad and angry when he learned five law enforcement officers were killed and seven wounded in a sniper attack in Dallas on Thursday night.

“The level of violence our colleagues face in the United States is that much greater than what we face in Canada,” said the president of the Winnipeg Police Association.

A deadly rampage like the one in the United States not only could happen in Canada, it already has.

In June 2014, Justin Bourque shot and killed three Mounties in Moncton, N.B., and wounded two others.

On July 7, 2006, two RCMP officers were killed by a gunman in Spiritwood, Sask.

On March 3, 2005, four young RCMP officers were fatally shot near the town of Mayerthorpe, Alta.

MONCTON, N.B.: JUNE 5, 2014 -- A police officer approaches a house on Mountain Rd. during a manhunt for Justin Bourque in Moncton, New Brunswick, on Wednesday, June 5, 2014. 

A police officer approaches a house on Mountain Rd. during a manhunt for Justin Bourque in Moncton, New Brunswick, on Wednesday, June 5, 2014.

Sabourin said the recent Dallas shooting was an unfortunate reminder that some officers pay the ultimate price while trying to keep their communities safe.

“I think in the back of everybody’s mind, they know it could happen here, so there’s always that heightened sense of vigilance to make sure everybody goes home safe at the end of the day,” he said.

Sabourin added that race relations are certainly different in Canada, but there are still issues that he worries could create “hatred towards police.”

Steve Kirby, the University of Manitoba director of jazz studies, said he was thrown to the ground by officers with cocked pistols when he lived in St. Louis, but he’s never faced police violence since moving to Canada.

“Here, I have had no run-ins with the cops,” he said.

Whatever happens in the United States we see the creep … into Canada

Kirby said he can’t make sense out of what is happening in his home country. As a black man, he said there are clear issues between police and minority populations, but violence is never the answer.

“I’m just really sad. It just feels like there is a certain small section of society that just wants violence,” he said. “It just feels like they are winning. They are getting their violence.”

Sabourin said it is unfortunate, but whatever happens in the United States, “We see the creep … into Canada.”

Canada’s police forces are affected by the tragedy in Dallas because officers feel a sense of camaraderie when someone in blue is killed, Sabourin said.

“It’s affected our members,” he said. “They hear that [officers were killed] and there is a multitude of emotions — there’s sadness, there’s disbelief, there’s anger.”

Dallas police Chief David Brown said Friday that the gunman who died at the end of a standoff with police said he “wanted to kill white people, especially white police officers.”

[SOURCE]

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde spoke of the difference in quality of living between Indigenous people and the rest of Canada during a speech at the Nishnawbe Aski Nation's Spring Chiefs Assembly in Timmins this week.

 Monday May 16, 2016. Alan S. Hale/Timmins Daily Press/Postmedia Network

Police Will Get Blamed During Missing, Murdered Inquiry: Chief

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde spoke of the difference in quality of living between Indigenous people and the rest of Canada during a speech at the Nishnawbe Aski Nation's Spring Chiefs Assembly in Timmins this week. Monday May 16, 2016. Alan S. Hale/Timmins Daily Press/Postmedia Network

Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde at the Nishnawbe Aski Nation’s Spring Chiefs Assembly in Timmins. May 16, 2016. Alan S. Hale/Timmins Daily Press/Postmedia Network

Winnipeg Sun,  June 01, 2016

Police across the country will bear much of the blame from an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls is released, Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde warned.

“Prepare yourselves because fingers are going to be pointed,” Bellegarde told the Canadian Association of Police Chiefs conference at the Fairmont Hotel.

“You didn’t do an adequate job. You didn’t put enough human and financial resources into the research and development, and the investigations surrounding all of these First Nations women.”

The inquiry concerns about 1,200 females across Canada.

“Be big enough to show that more work needs to be done to improve the system,” Bellegarde said in a speech promoting a better relationship between police and indigenous people. “How do you work and collaborate together? How do you share information? How do you get community members involved? How do you bring closure? How do you help them bring healing? Bottom line, it’s about working together and establishing relationships.”

Some agencies have already improved their policies, said Clive Weighill, the association’s president.

“The way we handle missing person cases, period, has changed,” said Weighill, who is also the Saskatoon Chief of Police. “The days of waiting 24 hours to report a missing person are gone … We have different ways to triage the reports now to make sure they don’t fall through the cracks.

“In Saskatoon, we have a full-time missing persons victims co-ordinator that works with the families. We have three people dedicated strictly to missing persons files to triage those files to make sure they’re getting investigated properly. We’re working closely with social services, very closely with the families. We’re involved with any awareness marches in Saskatoon and even building a memorial to the missing and murdered indigenous women right in front of our police headquarters. So, the world has changed in the last decade.”

The association has taken what Weighill says are two important steps to improving police’s work with indigenous people. No. 1: dedicated funding for on-reserve policing that can be relied upon every year.

The second piece is looking at ways to increase the safety of indigenous people living in cities.

“The federal government is not putting the money into the cities,” he said. “But the people living in cities are living in poverty, they’re living in poor housing; they need education help and the funding isn’t there.”

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2016/06/01/police-will-get-blamed-during-missing-murdered-inquiry-chief