RCMP investigate after officer reportedly wrote Facebook post that Colten Boushie ‘got what he deserved’

The RCMP is investigating reports an officer made a Facebook post saying Colten Boushie “got what he deserved.”

According to APTN News an RCMP officer on the Prairies posted the message, which said the shooting of the 22-year-old Indigenous man on a Saskatchewan farm should never have been about race.

Boushie, from the Red Pheasant First Nation, was shot and killed in 2016. Gerald Stanley, 56, was acquitted of second-degree murder in a verdict last week by an all-white jury, spurring protests across the country in what many believe was a racially motivated decision.

The female officer who made the post claims to police a First Nations community.

The RCMP told the Star that there are no officers with the name linked to the Facebook account, and didn’t confirm whether the woman worked as an officer under another name.

“Too bad the kid died but he got what he deserved. How many of us work on or near reserves and are getting fed up with the race card being used every time someone gets caught breaking the law?,” she said.

Facebook post from APTN

The comment was posted in a Facebook group called “News Stories that Matter to or May Impact RCMP,” and has since been deleted.

APTN did not disclose the person’s identity, but said two sources shared screenshots of the posting and revealed who the officer is.

“Obviously, this remark is absolutely appalling and unacceptable,” Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said in a teleconference with journalists Thursday.

The RCMP’s statement in response to the story said on- and off-duty members must behave in accordance with the force’s code of conduct and that a member’s use of the internet for social networking is subject to the same standards.

It said members must avoid compromising the integrity of the RCMP or portraying themselves or the organization in a disgraceful or discreditable manner. When concerns about disrespectful content believed to be written by an RCMP employee are raised, “they are and will be investigated and addressed.”

“The RCMP is once again reminding people that they can and will be held responsible for their communications, both in-person and on-line, and police will investigate any complaints of suspected criminal behaviour,” it said.

Human Remains Discovered on Farm in B.C. Region Where Five Women Have Gone Missing

RCMP vehicles are parked at a Salmon Arm property where human remains were discovered.

Curtis Wayne Sagmoen lived at farm where remains found 

Human remains were found on a rural property near Salmon Arm B.C., in an area where several women have gone missing.

According to the Vancouver Sun, the search of a farm by the RCMP Southeast District Major Crimes Unit has been unfolding for several days. Police first arrived at 2290 Salmon River Road on Thursday.

Police were also searching a separate strip of land along Springbend Road, between Salmon Arm and Enderby, in conjunction with the search at the Salmon River Road property.

Curtis Wayne Sagmoen, 36-years-old, the son of the farm’s owners was already under police investigation after a woman was threatened with a firearm following a pre-arranged meeting with the man in August. She was able to escape and call police.

An image of Curtis Sagmoen. -Salmon Arm Observer

Sagmoen, was arrested and released without charges.

On Oct. 13, RCMP issued a warning to the public, specifically to sex workers, in the area.

Sagmoen was re-arrested Friday and was charged with seven offences — including uttering threats and several firearms charges — in connection with the investigation.

According to media reports, Sagmoen, sometimes lived at the Salmon River Rd farm where the remains were found and was previously listed as a co-owner of the property.

On Monday, three kilometres north of the Salmon River Rd farm, officers photographed multiple items roadside before placing them in evidence bags, blocking the items from the view of passing residents.

Several residents joined waiting media roadside during day five of the activity.

By late Monday afternoon, about 20 people from various First Nations gathered for a drum prayer in front of the property.

The news that police found human remains at the site over the weekend follows months of uncertainty and anguish for families of women who have gone missing in the North Okanagan region between Sicamous and Vernon.

CTV News reports, over the past 18 months, at least five women have gone missing in the area. The missing women have been identified as Caitlin Potts, 27, Ashley Simpson, 27, Deanna Wertz, 46, Traci Genereaux, 18, and Nicole Bell, 31.

Police have not described the human remains found at the farm or said whether they are from one or more people. Nor have investigators made any links between the remains and the missing women.

No specific charges have been laid against Sagmoen in connection with the discovery at the farm.

Sagmoen is scheduled to appear in Vernon Provincial Court on Oct. 26.

 

Sabrina Polchies’s 2010 Death Still Raises Questions With Family

Sabrina Polchies was found dead in a Salisbury aprartment in 2010 at the age of 22. Foul play was ruled out by police, but her parents think she was murdered. (Facebook)

Sabrina Polchies was found dead in a Salisbury aprartment in 2010 at the age of 22. Foul play was ruled out by police, but her parents think she was murdered. (Facebook)

Mary Agnes Polchies feels her daughter’s 2010 death wasn’t properly investigated by the RCMP

By Tori Weldon, CBC News Posted: Jul 04, 2016

Sabrina Polchies, a Mi’kmaq woman from the Elsipogtog First Nation, moved to Moncton on Canada Day in 2010 to start a new life, but four days later she was found dead in a Salisbury apartment.

The RCMP ruled out foul play in her death six years ago, but members of her family believe Polchies was murdered.

It was July 1, 2010 and the 22 year-old posted, “Moving to Moncton whooo hoooo start a new life wish me luck.”

But only a few days later the RCMP would be knocking on her parents door, with news Mary Agnes Polchies describes as out of a nightmare.

The moment still haunts her.

“Two RCMP came over and they said, ‘We found an aboriginal woman dead in Moncton’ and I knew, I knew that was my baby,” she said.

Polchies had been worried about her 22-year-old daughter since the early hours of July 2, when she said she received a troubling phone call from Sabrina.

Polchies said her daughter sounded scared and said she didn’t know where she was.

Polchies describes pleading with her daughter to get a civic address, as she heard men swearing aggressively.

“I can hear in the background, ‘F–king squaw, you f–king bitch,'” she said.

“I was like, ‘Oh my God, get out of there.'”

Polchies said that’s when the line went dead. It was the last time she would ever speak to her daughter.

Body discovered on July 5

This is the Salisbury apartment where Polchies was found dead in July 2010. RCMP first deemed the death suspicious, until later in the week, the autopsy report, coroner’s report and evidence gathered led the RCMP to rule out foul play. (CBC)

This is the Salisbury apartment where Polchies was found dead in July 2010. RCMP first deemed the death suspicious, until later in the week, the autopsy report, coroner’s report and evidence gathered led the RCMP to rule out foul play. (CBC)

RCMP say it was two days later that Sabrina Polchies was reported missing on July 4.

But her mother insists she dialled 911 as soon as that call ended. And followed up again the next day, on July 3, and again July 4.

The young woman’s body was discovered on July 5 in a Salisbury apartment. Police said she died of a combination of alcohol and prescription medicine.

Foul play was ruled out on July 9.

But Polchies said she thinks the circumstances surrounding her daughter’s death are too suspicious to be ignored.

She said she’s heard rumours over the years suggesting that the men her daughter was with in the early hours of July 2, 2010, forcibly injected Sabrina with drugs, causing her death.

Wilson Polchies, Sabrina’s father, said his daughter’s cellphone was recovered from a dumpster days after she was found dead, he wonders why that didn’t raise more red flags for police.

“Mostly what bothers me is there is no justice at all. They dropped it and that was all,” he said.

Police investigation questioned

Six years after her daughter's death, Mary Agnes Polchies is still looking for closure. (CBC )

Six years after her daughter’s death, Mary Agnes Polchies is still looking for closure. (CBC )

Mary Agnes Polchies is also dissatisfied with the investigation carried out by the RCMP.

She said she feels that once the autopsy revealed drugs in her daughter’s system, she was written off.

“For like 25 minutes they did their job, just to look good on TV,” she said.

“They did what they had to do because they were in public’s eyes, but after you know, after when the public stopped caring that’s when they stopped. ‘Oh, she overdosed,’ that’s all.”

Cases highlight pattern

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the pattern of "no foul play" being found in so many deaths of aboriginal women is worthy of assessment. (CBC)

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the pattern of “no foul play” being found in so many deaths of aboriginal women is worthy of assessment. (CBC)

A CBC News investigation found this is just one case of dozens where police say there is no evidence of foul play, but the families of missing and murdered indigenous girls and women maintain their loved ones may have been victims of homicide.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett commented on Thursday that the cases highlighted in the investigation show a pattern.

“This isn’t just one time that this happened this seems to be way too common, she said.

Bennett expressed that the pattern of “no foul play” found in so many aboriginal women’s deaths is worthy of assessment.

“I think it is a teachable moment for policing across this country to really look at the kinds of assumptions that are being made, the kinds of decisions that are being taken based on assumptions instead of based on fact,” she said.

Roland Chrisjohn, an associate professor in the Department of Native Studies at St. Thomas University, said he agrees with the concerns raised by the minister.

Chrisjohn is writing a book about indigenous people and racism in Canada.

“The pattern of police under-investigation of indigenous deaths, particularly of women, is commonplace across Canada, and in my opinion another instantiation of Canada’s institutionalized racism toward native peoples.”

RCMP willing to meet family

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh said the Polchies family is welcome to contact their local RCMP detachment if they are looking for more information about their daughter's death. (RCMP/YouTube)

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh said the Polchies family is welcome to contact their local RCMP detachment if they are looking for more information about their daughter’s death. (RCMP/YouTube)

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh would not provide any specific details about the Polchies case.

But she said the Polchies family is welcome to contact their local RCMP detachment if they are looking for more information.

“The RCMP is always open to meeting with families to provide an update on investigations in their jurisdiction or to explain the reasons for the decision to close the file,” she said.

Mary Agnes Polchies isn’t interested in those reasons, she wants the file reopened and her daughter’s death investigated more thoroughly.

After six years, she said she still struggles with the unanswered questions surrounding her daughter’s death.

“I stopped crying so much, I mean I have bad days, I have really bad days, but not as much,” she said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/elsipogtog-missing-murdered-aboriginal-rcmp-1.3660595?cmp=abfb