Tag Archives: march

Nearly 100 March Against Gangs In Regina

The My Life Matters march makes its way down Albert Street to City Hall Matt Myers/Global News

The My Life Matters march makes its way down Albert Street to City Hall. Matt Myers/Global News

By David Baxter | Global News

REGINA – On Saturday morning close to 100 people marched from Cree Land Mini Mart to the Peace Fountain at City Hall. It’s an effort by “My Life Matters” to bring awareness to the pain caused by gang issues in Regina.

“Awareness that our children are being lost, our children are being stolen, kidnapped, raped, murdered, everything. My son…I’m still waiting on answers,” said organizer Richelle Dubois.

Her son Haven was found dead in Pilot Butte Creek in May this year. After nearly six months she is still waiting for answers, as to what happened to her son. This is why she and her colleagues organized the march.

“For me this is part of trying to keep awareness that I’m still here, my family is still here, and we still want answers to what happened to my son,” said Dubois.

Haven’s death was ruled not criminal, but his mother believes he was being pressured to join a gang.

Participants marched to show young people that there is a life outside of gangs in the inner city. Many marchers personally bare the wounds of a loved one who was senselessly taken. Margret Palletier-Hughes’ son, Richard Lowe, was killed near the 7-11 at Retallack Street and Dewdney Avenue in 2006.

“I wish it would stop, and people should not be afraid to come forward to tell people. If they see something, like my son, nobody has been charged in this yet, and that’s 9 years,” she said.

Now she takes care of her son’s three daughters. Palletier-Hughs came to the march to share her story because she wants to see a bright future for her granddaughters.

“We don’t want to see that keep going on. It’s gotta stop somewhere.”

This march marked the beginning of My Life Matters. Dubois and her partners are planning to continue sharing their message with the community.

“There is resources out there, but it’s how accessible are they to the children?” Dubois asked rhetorically. “Some of them I’m finding out I didn’t even know existed. So I guess trying to bring more light to these resources”

My Life Matters plans to release a brochure within a month to community centres throughout Regina with a list of service young people can contact if they feel they are in trouble.

http://globalnews.ca/news/2325541/nearly-100-march-against-gangs-in-regina/

Mohawks March To Mark 25th Anniversary Of 78-Day Oka Crisis Standoff

Mohawks from Kanesatake, Que., march to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, in Oka, Que., on Saturday, July 11, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Mohawks from Kanesatake, Que., march to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, in Oka, Que., on Saturday, July 11, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

The Canadian Press

Festivities took place Saturday to mark the 25th anniversary of the Oka Crisis, the tense 78-day standoff over disputed woods between Oka and Kanesatake.

Mohawks took a symbolic march through the pines near the controversial golf course at the root of the standoff.

Various native and non-native leaders spoke Saturday, as activities took place including a feast, a lacrosse game and a tug-of-war.

They also chanted and danced in town.

Marcel Lemay was shot on July 11, 1990, as police clashed with Mohawk Warriors in Kanesatake, just west of Montreal.

Lemay said it took time, but she has moved on and let go of the past, saying the priority now is to build trust between those on and off the reserve.

“My mandate is to destroy walls of ignorance or prejudice,” she said.

When shots rang out on that day in 1990, it forever changed those involved said Victor Bonspille, the Chief on Council of Kanesatake.

“I think it changes our community in a way where we’re all more united in terms of protecting our lands and our culture and our identity,” said Bonspille.

The Mohawks were upset the town of Oka had approved a golf course expansion onto territory they had never surrendered to the government.

The Canadian Forces were eventually called in and it was only in late September that the crisis ended.

Many now say both communities must move past their differences.

“I haven’t been here in the pines really much, maybe four or five times since the Oka Crisis, because I felt like I lost my sense of belonging here, and I used to be in the pines all the time. So I think it gave me some closure,” said Kanestake Grand Chief Serge Simon.

The pines are still under dispute, but Simon and Oka Mayor Pascal Quevillon are working closely together to protect it from future development.

“We’re going to hash out the details like what consists of the pines and how are we going to protect it. We’ve already had some discussion and I see there’s going to be some differences at that table which might require a mediator,” said Simon, with Quevillon adding that they plan to open a dialogue on how to protect the pines.

A quarter century later there are still many wounds left to heal. Tensions remain between the communities of Oka and Kanesetake, but many believe that positive steps have been taken towards reconciliation.

“Let’s be realistic. We’re not going anywhere, they’re not going anywhere, are we going to live in animosity and distrust forever? No, we can’t,” said Simon.

The province said it has plans to help add stability to the reserve.

“We’re working on a daycare centre. We’re working on improving educational opportunities, we’re working on better protection for elders, we’re working on economic development,” said Quebec Native Affairs Minister Geoffrey Kelley.

Thousands Attend Walk For Reconciliation In Ottawa

Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde (in headdress) and Justice Murray Sinclair (in black suit), TRC commissioner, march during the Walk for Reconciliation, part of the closing events of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Sunday, May 31, 2015 in Gatineau, Que. Beginning in the 1870s, over 150,000 First Nations, Metis and Inuit children were required to attend government-funded, church-run residential schools in an attempt to assimilate them into Canadian society; the last school closed in 1996. Students were prohibited from speaking their own languages, practicing their culture and often experienced physical and sexual abuse. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde (wearing a traditional headdress) and Justice Murray Sinclair (in front of him wearing sunglasses in a black suit) took part in the walk on Sunday. (The Canadian Press)

By Black Powder | Red Power Media

Thousands including; residential school survivors, along with their friends, family and supporters, marched through Ottawa on Sunday in the name of reconciliation and healing.

The march was part of the closing ceremonies of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

“It’s a dark chapter in Canada’s history, no question. It was cultural genocide,” said National Chief Perry Bellegarde, head of the Assembly of First Nations, who took part in the walk.

Led by drummers, the marchers carried banners and flags. Some held photos of loved ones who had experienced the schools, and other clasped the hands of children or grandchildren.

VIDEO: A dance and song in honour of all Residential School Survivors.

The crowd – marching in solidarity with the survivors walked crossed the Ottawa River along the Portage Bridge, passed Parliament Hill and the National War Memorial, and ended at Ottawa City Hall on Elgin Street.

Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, who addressed the crowd at City Hall, said about 7,000 people made the walk. Justice Murray Sinclair, the chair of the TRC, estimated that about 10,000 people showed up.

Closing ceremonies end Wednesday

Sunday’s walk was one of many events taking place from Sunday to Wednesday as part of a closing ceremony for the TRC.

The TRC prepares to release its final report on June 2.

Final report will be massive:

A 300-page summary of the final TRC report will be released as part of the final event. The full final report will include 6 volumes and more than 2 million words, as well as a volume with excerpts from survivors’ testimony.

Quebec City Climate-Change March Draws 25,000 People

A climate-change march drew about 25,000 people to the streets of Quebec City on April 11, 2015, as protesters try to encourage premiers to take a tougher stance on climate and pipeline regulations. (Mathieu Belanger/Reuters)

A climate-change march drew about 25,000 people to the streets of Quebec City on April 11, 2015, as protesters try to encourage premiers to take a tougher stance on climate and pipeline regulations. (Mathieu Belanger/Reuters)

CBC News

A climate-change march drew about 25,000 people to the streets of Quebec City on Saturday, as protesters try to encourage premiers to take a tougher stance on climate and pipeline regulations.

The march was organized by Act On Climate — a coalition of groups including environmental groups, unions, students and aboriginal groups.

It’s in preparation for a premiers’ summit on climate change which will take place on Tuesday, April 14.

The focus is a greener strategy for Canada’s provinces and territories.

About 100 buses were driven to the rally with many passengers from different parts of Quebec. Once there, they marched for about three kilometres to the National Assembly.

Protesters wore red and arranged themselves so that from the sky it looked like a bursting thermometer.

Protesters against pipelines

High on the list of demands from the group is stopping the building of new pipelines, including Keystone, Energy East, and Northern Gateway.

Serge Simon, the grand chief of Kanesatake, said Quebec environmentalists should look to British Columbia.

“You could take the example of the B.C. premier [Christy Clark]. The B.C. premier had a lot of pressure brought to them and they put these conditions that stopped Northern Gateway,” he said.

“The premier of Quebec [Philippe Couillard] can do the same thing if he stops catering to big corporate interests. I don’t see why he can’t do this.”

Saturday’s march concluded with a concert featuring Les Respectables, Yann Perreau and Sarah Harmer.

On Monday, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne will sign a deal with Quebec on a cap-and-trade system to limit carbon emissions.