Stunning Photos Show Life of Remote Indigenous Tribes in Brazil

Bej Indian in the Xingu river, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

Images offer rare glimpse into life of Brazilian tribes

These stunning photographs show the indigenous Kamaiurá people diving underwater and swimming beneath a waterfall in the Amazonian basin.

The tribe, which has a population of just over 500, lives in the Upper Xingu region around Lake Ipavu, four miles from the Kuluene River.

These incredible images offer a rare glimpse of life within remote Brazilian tribes and show women diving underwater

These images offer a rare glimpse of life within remote Brazilian tribes and show women diving underwater (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

These images offer a rare glimpse of life within remote Brazilian tribes and show women diving underwater (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

These images offer a rare glimpse of life within remote Brazilian tribes and show women diving underwater (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

The photos provide an overview of the contemporary situation of indigenous people in Brazil.

The Kamaiurá, whose name means ‘a raised platform to keep meat, pots and pans’, were first contacted by the outside world in 1884.

Its population was ravaged by disease in the 1950s.

Brazilian authorities declared the region a national park in 1961 to prevent the spread of deadly epidemics.


A member of the Tanawy Xucuru Cariri tribe stands beside the So Francisco river in the state of Alagoas. (Picture: Ricardo Stuckert)

Tribes men wearing traditional colourful clothing looked to the skies as they stand in the branches of a tree above a stretch of water in Brazil. (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

A tribesman on horseback looks out across a stretch of water as the sun sets. (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

The images were captured by photographer Ricardo Stuckert while spending time living with the indigenous community two years ago.

Stuckert said: ‘The pictures show the traditional way of life of these people who live in harmony with nature. They provide an overview of the contemporary situation of the indigenous people in Brazil.

“I’ve been a professional photographer for 29 years, and have been photographing Brazil’s Indigenous people since 1996, when I visited an Yanomany tribe. Since then, I have become a strong supporter of Indigenous people.”

Tribesmen perform a ceremonial dance in another of the photographer’s stunning images. (Photo: Ricardo Stuckert)

The collection of photographs has now been published in a book titled Brazilian Indians, as part of an effort by Stuckert to help them.


Indigenous Tribes in Peru Seize Oil Facilities Operated by Canadian Company

Indigenous tribes seize facilities at Peru oil field, warn of wider uprising 

Indigenous people living on Peru’s largest oil field concession have seized facilities operated by Frontera Energy.

They are demanding that the government apply an indigenous rights law before signing a new contract with the Canadian company.

Passed in 2011 the so-called prior consultation law, requires the government to seek input from indigenous people before approving any development plans that might affect them.

Tribal chiefs in Frontera’s Block 192 said the government has refused to carry out the consultation process even though it is negotiating a new contract with Frontera, whose 2-year contract is due to expire this month.

Protesters from the indigenous community had taken control of oil drums and other facilities to curb output in Block 192.

“If the government says it’ll carry out prior consultation, we’ll automatically end the protest” – Wilmer Chavez, chief of the community of Los Jardines

The same installation was hit with an occupation which began in April and ended in June. Indigenous communities had demanded US$1 million from Frontera for use of their territory.

Photo of occupation by El Commercio

Frontera, which produced some 7,500 barrels a day from Block 192 in July, said in a statement that it values community consent and that only the government could legally carry out prior consultation.

Amazonian tribes in Block 192 want the government to sign new commitments for the clean-up of oil pollution and for access to health care and education in the remote region before awarding Frontera a new contract.

Other Indigenous groups in the region are backing the occupation and warn there will be a wider uprising unless Peru begins proper consultations.

Nearly 25 representatives from some 120 Indigenous communities have been in Lima since Monday to talk with the government officials about the issue.

Chiefs of Amazonian tribes attend a news conference with the foreign media in Lima, Aug. 22, 2017.

Four other chiefs, speaking to foreign media in Lima described similar demands in the 16 out of 20 villages they represent in Block 192 and vowed to stage their own protests unless prior consultation was applied.

Carlos Sandi, chief of the Corrientes River basin, told reporters that the government must fulfill its promises to clean up oil pollution that is sickening local residents.

U.S. oil company Occidental Petroleum Corp operated Block 192 for about 40 years before Argentine energy company Pluspetrol took over in 2001.

Video of occupation by El Commercio