First Nation wants Inquiry into Racism, Assaults linked to Hydro development

York Factory First Nation Chief Leroy Constant speaks to media in Winnipeg on Friday, Sept. 7, 2018.

A northern Manitoba First Nation is calling for a provincial inquiry into racism, discrimination and violence linked to hydroelectric development on its territory.

York Factory First Nation Chief Leroy Constant said Premier Brian Pallister should order an inquiry into the Crown-owned Manitoba Hydro.

“They need to acknowledge the collective and individual trauma that has been occurring through northern hydroelectric development in the province,” he said at a Winnipeg news conference Friday.

A report released last month by the province’s Clean Environment Commission — an arm’s length review agency — outlined discrimination and sexual abuse at the Crown utility’s work sites in the 1960s and 1970s. The report said the arrival of a largely male construction workforce led to the sexual abuse of Indigenous women and some alleged their complaints to RCMP were ignored.

The report said there was also racial tension, environmental degradation and an end to the traditional way of life for some Indigenous people.

Sustainable Development Minister Rochelle Squires has called the allegations in the commission’s report disturbing and said she is referring the issue to the RCMP.

Since the release of the report, Constant said traumatic memories have resurfaced in the Indigenous communities hurt by hydro development.

First Nations have tried to bring the issues up in the past, but Constant said it always fell on deaf ears. He said issues with hydro development, including harassment and racism, continue to this day.

“It’s impacted women for decades, since the ’50s and nothing has changed. Women are still treated the same as then,” said York Factory Coun. Evelyn Beardy.

“I want to see a day where, before the project is done, that my member doesn’t phone me and say she’s been called a savage or she’s walking down the hallway and has been groped. I’d like to see that stopped. It has to stop.”

No one from the Manitoba government or Manitoba Hydro was immediately available for comment.

Martina Saunders, an Indigenous woman who resigned from a board overseeing construction of Manitoba Hydro’s Keeyask generating station, recently filed a complaint with the Manitoba Human Rights Commission alleging she and other Indigenous members were being ignored and bullied.

Without a full understanding of issues around racism and violence on hydro projects, Constant said Indigenous people will continue to be victimized.

He and other leaders want the inquiry to look at the prevalence of racism and harassment as well how the province, Manitoba Hydro, contractors and law enforcement responded to complaints over the decades. It should recommend culturally relevant victim support and ways to prevent racism and harassment in the future.

Constant said he will be sending a letter requesting a meeting with the premier and other officials to discuss the request.

“It comes down to reconciliation and hearing from our members that have experienced this. On Manitoba Hydro’s part I think it will reveal what truly happened over the past 60 years historically,” Constant said.

“There is a lot of hurt, there is a lot of anger.”

Source: Winnipegsun.com

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First Nation Questions Relationship with Canada Following Court Ruling

Myeengun Henry, then a band councillor for Chippewas of the Thames. – Marta Iwanek / Toronto Star

Meaningful engagement with Chippewas of the Thames First Nation includes securing our free, prior, and informed consent when any government proposes to take actions that impact our rights, including our lands, territories and resources

by Myeengun Henry

I write on behalf of my First Nation in relation to the recent decision from the Supreme Court of Canada regarding .Chippewas of the Thames First Nation v. Enbridge Pipelines Inc., 2017 SCC 41, which leaves our members questioning the meaning of an ongoing nation-to-nation relationship with the Canadian government.

This decision, which allows Enbridge to reverse the flow and increase capacity of crude oil on the Line 9 Pipeline, significantly impacts our community and its members, and as you may expect, has not been well received.

Though the National Energy Board failed to fully recognize and respect our Aboriginal and treaty rights, the Supreme Court upheld the NEB process nonetheless. The question the court failed to address is what recourse does our nation have to protect its rights going forward?

What if a tribunal, such as the NEB, improperly addresses or fails to recognize an Aboriginal right with no Crown oversight. As a final decision maker, what recourse would a First Nation have to then protect its rights? A decision from the NEB can effectively extinguish an Aboriginal and/or treaty right.

It is clear the courts are not prepared to protect our constitutionally entrenched rights. And now we must question what the government is prepared to do? Offering our nation an opportunity to participate in fundamentally inadequate consultations does not preserve the “honour of the Crown” and completely ignores our historical treaty relationship.

The decision of the Supreme Court has an immediate and chilling effect on our nation. We are currently inundated with applications on numerous resource development projects. We are most concerned that the Crown will fully adopt the reasoning of the Supreme Court and completely rely on any and all regulatory processes to satisfy its duty to consult. Such a result is not acceptable.

The Supreme Court’s ruling allows the Canadian government to delegate a nation-to-nation relationship to resource companies who are now empowered to determine the potential impacts of our nation’s constitutionally protected rights without any direct Crown involvement.

This is extremely troublesome and was not the intention of our people when we agreed to share in the protection and management of our land and resources as set out in our Treaties including the Longwoods Treaty of 1822; the London Township Treaty of 1796; the Sombra Treaty of 1796; Treaty No. 29 of 1827; and the McKee Treaty of 1790.

Justice Minister and Attorney General, Jody Wilson-Raybould, recently released the Government of Canada’s 10 principles to assist in achieving reconciliation with Indigenous peoples through a “renewed, nation to nation, government to government, and Inuit-Crown relationship based on recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership.”

Specifically, Canada stated, “Canada’s constitutional and legal order recognizes the reality that Indigenous peoples’ ancestors owned and governed the lands which now constitute Canada prior to the Crown’s assertion of sovereignty. All of Canada’s relationships with Indigenous peoples are based on recognition of this fact and supported by the recognition of Indigenous title and rights, as well as the negotiation and implementation of pre- Confederation, historic, and modern treaties.”

This principle is intended to honour historic treaties as frameworks for living together, including the modern expression of these relationships. In accordance with the Royal Proclamation of 1763, and the accompanying Treaty at Niagara, 1764, many Indigenous nations and the Crown historically relied on treaties for mutual recognition and respect to frame their relationships.

The treaty relationship between the Chippewas nation and the Crown is a foundation for ongoing co-operation and partnership. The spirit and intent of both Indigenous and Crown parties to treaties, as reflected in oral and written histories, must inform constructive partnerships, based on the recognition of rights, that support full and timely treaty implementation.

To protect our rights and way of life the Chippewas of the Thames have developed our own consultation law (Deshkan Ziibiing/Chippewas of the Thames First Nation Wiindmaagewin), which is now being enforced within our traditional territory.

Our own consultation law will now be provided to any and all developers operating or intending to operate within our traditional territory. Further to the Canadian government’s guiding principles our nation will be asserting our own self-determination with respect to consultation within our territory.

Meaningful engagement with our nation includes securing our free, prior, and informed consent when any government proposes to take actions that impact our rights, including our lands, territories and resources. It is through the assertion and enforcement of our own laws that we can guarantee our lands and territory are properly protected for the enjoyment of future generations.

– Myeengun Henry is chief of the Chippewas of the Thames First Nation

Article originally published in the Toronto Star on Aug. 11, 2017

[SOURCE]

Canadian Tire Employee Involved In Altercation With Indigenous Elder Loses His Job

Kamo Cappo at a Canadian Tire store in east Regina

By Black Powder | RPM Staff, July 30, 2017

Canadian Tire says employee involved in altercation with Indigenous man at a Regina store is no longer with the company.

Kamao Cappo of the Muscowpetung First Nation posted a video to social media last week that showed an employee trying to physically removed him from the store.

Cappo, an Indigenous elder, said he was shopping for a chainsaw when the employee accused him of stealing.

Cappo disagreed and refused to leave the store.

53-year-old Cappo who has a heart condition was injured in the confrontation.

Cappo told CTV Regina that he believes the fact that he is Indigenous was a factor in the employee’s response.

“The employee involved in the matter has not been working in the store since the incident and he is no longer with Canadian Tire,” the corporation announced Saturday on its official Twitter account.

“We have tried to reach Mr. Cappo again to express our sincere apologies,” said another tweet from Canadian Tire“We take this matter very seriously.”

Protesters gather outside a Regina Canadian Tire store on Friday, July 28, 2017.

About 50 people staged a demonstration outside of the store Friday to show support for Cappo.

Regina police have said they are investigating the incident as an assault.

 

Sagkeeng First Nation Mourns Slain Teen at Vigil Attended by Hundreds

Family, friends and supporters met at Sagkeeng’s powwow grounds on Thursday as part of a vigil for Serena McKay. (CBC)

Serena McKay was found dead on Sunday; 2 teens have since been charged with her murder

CBC News Posted: Apr 27, 2017

Hundreds of people from Sagkeeng First Nation came together Thursday night in honour of a 19-year-old woman from the community who was killed over the weekend.

Serena McKay was found dead on Sunday in the community of roughly 4,000 people, 100 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg.

The body of Serena McKay, 19, was found Sunday evening in Sagkeeng First Nation. Two teenage girls have been arrested in connection with her death. (Del Daniels/Facebook)

On Thursday, family, friends and supporters met at Sagkeeng’s powwow grounds to honour her memory and begin community healing.

“I didn’t really know her. It’s just really devastating, because I have a sister. When I heard about that, it kind of touched me,” said Elvis Atkinson, 20.

“The community needs to open up their eyes on the younger generation … how these young generation drink, drugs in the community.”

McKay had recently moved to Sagkeeng and was set to graduate high school in June. Two girls from her school, aged 16 and 17, have been charged with second-degree murder in connection with her death.

People at Thursday’s vigil for Serena McKay say the community needs to begin healing. (CBC)

Sagkeeng Anicinabe High School principal Claude Guimond said the environment at the vigil was moving and emotional. Indigenous leaders including Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak and Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief Kevin Hart were in attendance, he added.

“There’s nothing so devastating as losing a young life like that, so senselessly taken, before she even started to live, really, you know? Never got that chance,” he said. “That’s one of the most devastating things to endure.”

Elvis Atkinson, 20, lives on Sagkeeng First Nation. He didn’t know Serena McKay personally, but said her death moved him. (CBC)

Guimond said ceremony and tradition play a powerful role in community healing.

“Of course, the drumming, you know, that’s the heartbeat of our nation,” he said. “That’s the heartbeat of Anishinaabe people, is the drum, and it’s so strong.”

Claude Guimond, principal of Sagkeeng Anicinabe High School, said the Thursday evening vigil was moving and emotional. (CBC)

[SOURCE]

Principal After Violent Death: Drugs and Gangs ‘Killing Our Youth’

Views of Sagkeeng First Nation which sits on the north and south shore of the Winnipeg River near Pine Falls Manitoba. Dec 19, 2014 Ruth Bonneville / Winnipeg Free Press

  • Staff | CP – Apr 26, 2017

SAGKEENG FIRST NATION, Man. — The killing of a 19-year-old high school student and a graphic video believed to be linked to the death has shocked a small Manitoba First Nation that has seen more than its share of tragedy.

RCMP said Wednesday they were reviewing the video circulating on social media to determine whether it was indeed connected to the death on the Sagkeeng reserve, 120 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg.

They also said they had arrested two girls, 16 and 17 years old, on charges of second-degree murder.

RCMP would not identify the victim, but community members said she was Serena McKay. The two accused cannot be identified under the Youth Criminal Justice Act.

All three were students at the Sagkeeng Anicinabe High School, said principal Claude Guimond.

“We’re not a very big school. We only have about 220 students here … and all three of the students in the video, I know them personally and it was hard to take,” Guimond said.

“Tuesday we had a healing ceremony for our students and staff … and one of the recurring things that came out was how social media — Facebook, you know — made things even worse by people reposting the video.”

The video shows a young woman lying bloodied on the ground and barely conscious as she is repeatedly kicked and punched in the head. It appears to have been taken on a cellphone. Female and male voices can be heard.

McKay is the woman being attacked in the video, Guimond said.

RCMP would only say the victim’s body was found Sunday night, near a home in Sagkeeng, about two hours after she was reported missing to the detachment in the neighbouring town of Powerview.

Counsellors were brought in this week to help students and staff at the school deal with the death. A vigil was planned for the community on Thursday evening.

Sagkeeng, a community of some 3,000 residents, was also the home of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine, whose body was pulled from the Red River in Winnipeg in 2014. She had left Sagkeeng just two months earlier. Her father, Eugene Fontaine, was beaten to death on the reserve three years earlier.

The small community has seen several other cases of missing and murdered indigenous women, including 17-year-old Fonessa Bruyere, who was killed in Winnipeg in 2007.

Guimond said gang activity and drug use have encroached on the community from the city.

“Over the last 10 years, what I’ve noticed is that more and more of the gang influence is filtering on to the reserve from Winnipeg,” Guimond said.

“With gang activity comes drug trafficking and stuff like that, and that’s what’s killing our youth here.”

Sagkeeng Chief Derrick Henderson said everyone is trying to come to terms with the latest death.

“It’s been tragic and it’s pretty sombre right now.”

By Steve Lambert in Winnipeg

The Canadian Press

[SOURCE]

Video Linked to Serena McKay Homicide Needs to Be Pulled Off Facebook, Chief Says

The body of Serena McKay, 19, was found Sunday evening in Sagkeeng First Nation. Two teenage girls have been arrested and charged in her death. (Del Daniels/Facebook)

2 teenage girls from Sagkeeng First Nation charged with 2nd-degree murder in McKay’s death

CBC News Posted: Apr 26, 2017

The chief of Manitoba’s Sagkeeng First Nation wants the video of a vicious attack on a young woman — some say the same woman later found dead in the community — pulled off Facebook.

The body of the woman believed to be the victim in the video, 19-year-old Serena McKay, was found Sunday night near a home in the community 100 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg.

The video is disturbing and its continued existence is extremely difficult for McKay’s mom, who hasn’t even seen her daughter’s body yet, said Chief Derrick Henderson.

Serena McKay

“I know the mom personally. It’s very hard for her,” he said, adding he hopes she will see her daughter on Wednesday and then funeral arrangements will be made.

“Today’s going to be a tough day for her,” he said.

Two teenage girls from the community have been charged with second-degree murder in McKay’s death. The girls, aged 16 and 17, cannot be identified due to provisions in the Youth Criminal Justice Act. Both are being held in custody.

​All three went to Sagkeeng Anicinabe High School, but McKay lived in the neighbouring community of Powerview-Pine Falls.

The video, which has been shared many times on Facebook, shows a girl being beaten but doesn’t clearly identify anyone.

“I’ve asked Facebook and I’ve asked the major crimes unit to get that video removed, whatever it takes,” Henderson said. “I mean that’s part of the investigation again, right? It’s evidence.

“It’s pretty hard once it gets out there, I guess. But there must be some mechanism there available.”

RCMP are aware of the video, but a spokesperson would not confirm whether the person being attacked is McKay. Sgt. Paul Manaigre said officers are reviewing the video to determine if it is relevant to their investigation.

He also said the video is being passed around via Facebook Messenger, which means it cannot be controlled by Facebook but only by those sharing it.

Henderson hopes the homicide sparks a conversation that starts to bring changes to Sagkeeng.

​”It’s devastating for everybody. Even me, as a leader, it’s so hard to stomach, but we have to continue and move forward and try to make it a better place for our people,” he said.

“I’m not sure what the circumstances are of what happened but I know a lot of it can be related to lots of factors like addictions. I know that’s an issue in my community, it’s an issue everywhere, and we need to deal with those things.”

Henderson also wants to see parents held more accountable for keeping an eye on their children.

“They need to be more responsible towards their children: ‘Where are you? Why are you not home?’ Things like that,” he said. “Where’s the moms and dads?”

Henderson plans to speak about those issues at a vigil for McKay planned for Thursday at 6 p.m. in Sagkeeng.

McKay was last seen by a family friend on Saturday evening and was reported missing to Powerview RCMP on Sunday around 6 p.m.

As officers searched the area, they received a call two hours later — around 8 p.m. — that her body had been found.

[SOURCE]

Family of Lake Manitoba Woman Shot in West Broadway Devastated, Chief Says

Winnipeg police say Shania Chartrand, 21, died after being shot in West Broadway over the weekend. She is from Lake Manitoba First Nation, and Chief Cornell McLean says her death has left the community devastated. (Facebook)

Shania Chanel Chartrand, 21, died after being found shot on Spence Street Sunday night

CBC News: Mar 15, 2017

Members of Lake Manitoba First Nation are devastated after the killing of a woman from the community in Winnipeg last weekend, the First Nation’s chief says.

Shania Chanel Chartrand, 21, was taken to hospital after being found in West Broadway with gunshot wounds Sunday night, but died of her injuries.

“She’s been taken too soon by this tragic event,” Lake Manitoba Chief Cornell McLean said.

“I’m devastated myself for the community. She touched a lot of hearts.”

Police investigate the homicide scene on Spence Street on Monday morning. (CBC)

McLean said Chartrand came from a large Lake Manitoba First Nation family.

“She was the second youngest child … It’s been very hard on the family,” he said.

McLean said Chartrand was living in Winnipeg and he often gave her rides to the city after she came back to Lake Manitoba to visit her family.

He said while there are rumours swirling about what may have happened to her, there are still more questions than answers.

“I know that she wasn’t involved in any gang activity. I do know that for sure,” Mclean said.

“It could have just been wrong place wrong time for her,” McLean said.

After reports of gunshots in the area, police located Chartrand on Spence Street, between Portage Avenue and Broadway, just after 10 p.m. Sunday night.

There haven’t been any arrests related to the shooting yet.

Homicide investigators are asking anyone with information or surveillance video to contact them at 204-986-6508 or through Crime Stoppers at 204-786-TIPS (8477).

[SOURCE]

Bigstone Cree Nation Blocks Roads, Denies Access to Oil and Gas Companies

The Bigstone Cree First Nation wrote a letter intending to install gates to and from the community to control who comes in or out. (Terry Reith/CBC)

Chief plans toll to access natural resources

By Black Powder | RPM Staff, March 14, 2017

Bigstone Cree Nation Chief Gordon Auger is taking action against off-reserve industrial operators in the Wabasca area.

On March 10, the First Nation in Northern Alberta, posted a list of multinational companies on its website that would not be allowed access to the territory as of Monday, March 13th.

Companies on the no-entry list include:

  • CNRL
  • Cenovus
  • Husky
  • Laricina
  • Alberta Pacific Ltd.
  • BonaVista
  • TransCanada
  • Banister
  • Tolko
  • West Fraser
  • All Logging Trucks
  • All Star Contracting
  • Exact Oilfield

Read: the full entry/no-entry list here

According to CBC News, Bigstone Cree Nation issued a letter to Indigenous Relations Minister Richard Feehan on Feb. 20. The letter cited six reasons roads would be blocked, including “the abandonment of the local economy and local companies,” along with a lack of meaningful consultation between the band and oil and gas companies and concerns around water protection.

The letter said the community was planning on installing gates to control all traffic going through the reserve — and all oil and gas traffic heading to work.

Wind Speaker reports, at about noon on Monday, some vehicles belonging to multinational oil, gas and forestry companies were being denied access at turn-around points established on Highways 813 and 754 on Bigstone Cree Nation land.

However, on Sunday, Chief Auger told Windspeaker.com it was never his intention to turn around vehicles belonging to multi-national corporations as of Monday.

Auger says he didn’t plan this action and steps may have been taken due to misinterpretation of his directive by the management team.

Toll booths

Auger said the direction he gave to council was to determine where toll booths should be located. Then, he said, signs will be put up indicating toll booth locations and when toll-taking would begin. Augers says this will be the item on the agenda when he meets with council Tuesday morning.

He also contends that band members have the right to take action.

“They’re just practicing right now,” he said. “It’s a good exercise, but I don’t think they should be sending people back, just maybe let them know … maybe a public awareness.”

A Public Notice on the band’s website states, on March 14, 2017, Bigstone Cree Nation maintains their “STAND” that originates from the Treaty signed in 1899. This is not a blockade but rather to have toll stations set up on highway 754 and 813 to monitor who is accessing and removing resources from Bigstone Cree Traditional Land.

All traffic will be allowed through for the time being, but the monitors will remain at the sites until further notice.

Auger has said he’s not worried about companies pulling out of the area.

“We’re tired of living in a third-world situation,” he said. “Nobody should have control of our land. It’s our land.”

The border security manned toll stations not only allow the band to control who comes in and out of the territory but could also generate revenue for the community.

Protestors block Highway 754 at the Bigstone Cree First Nation as part of the Idle No More movement. The two hour blockade near Wabasca-Desmarais included a second road block on Hwy 813. PHOTO: DWAYNE YELLOWKNEE

Travis Gladue says Chief Auger is shutting out off-reserve industry without having gone to the membership first.

“He never even consulted with the membership. He never even held a band meeting. The last band meeting he had was Nov. 30 and there was a motion to have him removed,” said Gladue.

Minutes from the Calling Lake general membership meeting, provided by Gladue, indicate that a motion was made to remove Auger as “the lead negotiator for industry for Bigstone Cree Nation effective immediately. The motion was passed by a majority vote.

Gladue says the chief’s latest stand with industry will only hurt band members.

“CNRL already said they’ll issue a statement that they provide lots of jobs, lots of work to a lot of local companies that are First Nations and Metis and now they’re very, very upset and these are Bigstone members and they don’t understand why Gordon is doing what he’s doing,” said Gladue. “Because now they can’t go to work.”

Gladue alleges that Auger is wanting to charge industry 15 per cent royalty to access natural resources from the First Nation’s land. Gladue says industry is refusing to pay.

Kyle Ferguson, a spokesperson for the ministry of Indigenous relations, said the government will “make every effort to prevent the establishment of toll gates.”

“The Alberta government is aware of the potential construction of highway toll gates near Bigstone Cree Nation and is working diligently with Bigstone Chief and Council to resolve the issue promptly,” he said

“Our intent is to resolve this issue peacefully and expeditiously. Industry in the area has been notified and RCMP officers have been dispatched to monitor the situation and to alert drivers to ensure the safety of motorists and members of the First Nations,” said Ferguson in an email.

Bigstone Cree Nation is 300 km north of Edmonton Alberta. 

Sources:

cbc.ca

Windspeaker.com

Family Looking For Justice After Deadly Shooting Of Colten Boushie, Near Biggar, Sask

Colten Boushie was killed on a farm near Biggar, Sask. on Aug. 9. (Facebook)

Colten Boushie was killed on a farm near Biggar, Sask. on Aug. 9. (Facebook)

Funeral held for Colten Boushie

Red Power Media, Staff | August 13, 2016

A Saskatchewan First Nation held a funeral for Colten Boushie, shot dead Tuesday, on a property in the Rural Municipality of Glenside, —near Biggar Sask— about 90 kilometres northwest of Saskatoon.

According to CBC News, RCMP said five individuals came on to a private property and were confronted by the property owners.

Boushie, 22-years-old, was shot and pronounced dead at the scene.

“The news release the RCMP issued the following day provided just enough prejudicial information for the average reader to draw their own conclusions that the shooting was somehow justified,” wrote FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron in a media release.

The occupants of the vehicle, including Boushie, were not known to the property owners and a verbal exchange broke out resulting in a firearm going off striking Boushie who was inside the vehicle.

Biggar RCMP charged a man with second-degree murder. He briefly appeared in North Battleford Provincial Court on Aug 11th.

Courtney Markewich reports, Family of Boushie, from as far away as Alberta and the northwest U.S., gathered on the Red Pheasant First Nation Saturday morning for the young man’s funeral.

CaptureCBC

Debbie Baptiste described her son, Colten Boushie, as a “good guy” who liked to help out his community on the Red Pheasant First Nation.

Boushie’s mother, Debbie Baptiste, said it wasn’t long ago that her son was one of the men in the community helping with other people’s funerals.

“We have our traditional ways out here, how we do things around here. And one of the things [is] when we’re burying somebody, a fire is lit and somebody has to watch it all night until morning,” Baptiste explained.

“So my sons would do that,” she said. “They’d sit out at that fire and they didn’t even know the person who was laying in there who they were burying, but they wanted to help and that’s how they’d help out.”

This time the fire was lit for her son, who Baptiste said was a well-educated and caring young man.

Family from as far away as Alberta and the northwest U.S. gathered on the Red Pheasant First Nation Saturday morning for the funeral of Colten Boushie. (OLIVIER FERAPIE/RADIO-CANADA)

Family from as far away as Alberta and the northwest U.S. gathered on the Red Pheasant First Nation Saturday morning for the funeral of Colten Boushie. (OLIVIER FERAPIE/RADIO-CANADA)

Looking for Justice 

Many mourners on the First Nation said there are a lot of questions about what happened the day Boushie was killed and how the RCMP handled releasing information about it.

“We don’t want this to be swept under the rug,” Alvin Baptiste, Boushie’s uncle, said.

“We’re focused on laying Colten to rest right now but now my family will stand up and they’re ready to support and rally for justice.”

Go Fund Me campaigns

Go Fund Me page was started for Boushie’s family asking for donations so they could host a proper post-funeral feast and other funeral expenses.

As of Friday night the Go Fund Me page raised $8,690 of its $10,000 goal. While the family’s fundraising campaign was embraced on social media, another campaign was quickly launched and shut down.

The alleged shooter’s campaign, apparently to raise money to pay for his legal defence, reached $1,000 before it was shut down. The crowdfunding site has a policy against fundraising in support of people accused of being involved in criminal activities.

Gerald Stanley, 54, of Biggar, has been remanded into custody until Aug 18th.

A facebook event called Justice for Colten has also been made with a rally outside the Provincial Court House in North Battleford on Aug 18th at 9 AM. 

Sabrina Polchies’s 2010 Death Still Raises Questions With Family

Sabrina Polchies was found dead in a Salisbury aprartment in 2010 at the age of 22. Foul play was ruled out by police, but her parents think she was murdered. (Facebook)

Sabrina Polchies was found dead in a Salisbury aprartment in 2010 at the age of 22. Foul play was ruled out by police, but her parents think she was murdered. (Facebook)

Mary Agnes Polchies feels her daughter’s 2010 death wasn’t properly investigated by the RCMP

By Tori Weldon, CBC News Posted: Jul 04, 2016

Sabrina Polchies, a Mi’kmaq woman from the Elsipogtog First Nation, moved to Moncton on Canada Day in 2010 to start a new life, but four days later she was found dead in a Salisbury apartment.

The RCMP ruled out foul play in her death six years ago, but members of her family believe Polchies was murdered.

It was July 1, 2010 and the 22 year-old posted, “Moving to Moncton whooo hoooo start a new life wish me luck.”

But only a few days later the RCMP would be knocking on her parents door, with news Mary Agnes Polchies describes as out of a nightmare.

The moment still haunts her.

“Two RCMP came over and they said, ‘We found an aboriginal woman dead in Moncton’ and I knew, I knew that was my baby,” she said.

Polchies had been worried about her 22-year-old daughter since the early hours of July 2, when she said she received a troubling phone call from Sabrina.

Polchies said her daughter sounded scared and said she didn’t know where she was.

Polchies describes pleading with her daughter to get a civic address, as she heard men swearing aggressively.

“I can hear in the background, ‘F–king squaw, you f–king bitch,'” she said.

“I was like, ‘Oh my God, get out of there.'”

Polchies said that’s when the line went dead. It was the last time she would ever speak to her daughter.

Body discovered on July 5

This is the Salisbury apartment where Polchies was found dead in July 2010. RCMP first deemed the death suspicious, until later in the week, the autopsy report, coroner’s report and evidence gathered led the RCMP to rule out foul play. (CBC)

This is the Salisbury apartment where Polchies was found dead in July 2010. RCMP first deemed the death suspicious, until later in the week, the autopsy report, coroner’s report and evidence gathered led the RCMP to rule out foul play. (CBC)

RCMP say it was two days later that Sabrina Polchies was reported missing on July 4.

But her mother insists she dialled 911 as soon as that call ended. And followed up again the next day, on July 3, and again July 4.

The young woman’s body was discovered on July 5 in a Salisbury apartment. Police said she died of a combination of alcohol and prescription medicine.

Foul play was ruled out on July 9.

But Polchies said she thinks the circumstances surrounding her daughter’s death are too suspicious to be ignored.

She said she’s heard rumours over the years suggesting that the men her daughter was with in the early hours of July 2, 2010, forcibly injected Sabrina with drugs, causing her death.

Wilson Polchies, Sabrina’s father, said his daughter’s cellphone was recovered from a dumpster days after she was found dead, he wonders why that didn’t raise more red flags for police.

“Mostly what bothers me is there is no justice at all. They dropped it and that was all,” he said.

Police investigation questioned

Six years after her daughter's death, Mary Agnes Polchies is still looking for closure. (CBC )

Six years after her daughter’s death, Mary Agnes Polchies is still looking for closure. (CBC )

Mary Agnes Polchies is also dissatisfied with the investigation carried out by the RCMP.

She said she feels that once the autopsy revealed drugs in her daughter’s system, she was written off.

“For like 25 minutes they did their job, just to look good on TV,” she said.

“They did what they had to do because they were in public’s eyes, but after you know, after when the public stopped caring that’s when they stopped. ‘Oh, she overdosed,’ that’s all.”

Cases highlight pattern

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the pattern of "no foul play" being found in so many deaths of aboriginal women is worthy of assessment. (CBC)

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the pattern of “no foul play” being found in so many deaths of aboriginal women is worthy of assessment. (CBC)

A CBC News investigation found this is just one case of dozens where police say there is no evidence of foul play, but the families of missing and murdered indigenous girls and women maintain their loved ones may have been victims of homicide.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett commented on Thursday that the cases highlighted in the investigation show a pattern.

“This isn’t just one time that this happened this seems to be way too common, she said.

Bennett expressed that the pattern of “no foul play” found in so many aboriginal women’s deaths is worthy of assessment.

“I think it is a teachable moment for policing across this country to really look at the kinds of assumptions that are being made, the kinds of decisions that are being taken based on assumptions instead of based on fact,” she said.

Roland Chrisjohn, an associate professor in the Department of Native Studies at St. Thomas University, said he agrees with the concerns raised by the minister.

Chrisjohn is writing a book about indigenous people and racism in Canada.

“The pattern of police under-investigation of indigenous deaths, particularly of women, is commonplace across Canada, and in my opinion another instantiation of Canada’s institutionalized racism toward native peoples.”

RCMP willing to meet family

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh said the Polchies family is welcome to contact their local RCMP detachment if they are looking for more information about their daughter's death. (RCMP/YouTube)

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh said the Polchies family is welcome to contact their local RCMP detachment if they are looking for more information about their daughter’s death. (RCMP/YouTube)

RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Marsh would not provide any specific details about the Polchies case.

But she said the Polchies family is welcome to contact their local RCMP detachment if they are looking for more information.

“The RCMP is always open to meeting with families to provide an update on investigations in their jurisdiction or to explain the reasons for the decision to close the file,” she said.

Mary Agnes Polchies isn’t interested in those reasons, she wants the file reopened and her daughter’s death investigated more thoroughly.

After six years, she said she still struggles with the unanswered questions surrounding her daughter’s death.

“I stopped crying so much, I mean I have bad days, I have really bad days, but not as much,” she said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/elsipogtog-missing-murdered-aboriginal-rcmp-1.3660595?cmp=abfb