Category Archives: By Red Power Media, Staff

Native American Activist ‘Jess Sixkiller’ Shot To Death In Home Invasion

Jess Sixkiller (Photo: Sixkiller family photo)

Jess Sixkiller (Photo: Sixkiller family photo)

By Red Power Media, Staff

Phoenix police are investigating a violent home invasion in which a prominent member of the Cherokee community was shot and killed.

The wife of, 78-year-old, Jess Sixkiller called 911 about 3:15 a.m. Friday, to report she believed someone was inside the home she shared with her husband.

Police spokesman James Holmes said she heard someone attempting to break into the home. She then heard what she believed to be a gunshot and found her husband in another room.

When officers arrived, they took the woman from the home and during a sweep of the house, they discovered Sixkiller shot to death.

She told authorities that she thought she heard someone say “police” in broken English, police said.

Police are continuing to investigate and asking for the public’s help in identifying the perpetrator.

The daughter of the victim identified her father as Jess Sixkiller, a former Chicago police officer and a Native American rights activist.

A memorial fund has been set up in Sixkiller’s name. Donations can be made to:

Wells Fargo Bank
Jess Sixkiller Memorial
Account #2457886071

Phoenix Police Homicide detectives have very little to go on in this investigation and they are asking anyone who may have seen or heard anything, or who may have information about this homicide to call Silent Witness at (480) WIT-NESS. As always, any caller may remain anonymous.

At this point in the investigation, they don’t know whether anything was stolen, but say there are signs of forced entry.

UPDATED: Dudley George’s Brother Accidentally Set On Fire During Camp Ipperwash Protest

Pierre George is engulfed in flames during a dispute between members of the Kettle and Stony Point First Nations at the entrance to the former army camp being returned by the federal government in Ipperwash, Ont. on Sunday September 20, 2015. Craig Glover/The London Free Press/Postmedia Networ

Pierre George is engulfed in flames during a dispute between members of the Kettle and Stony Point First Nations at the entrance to the former army camp being returned by the federal government in Ipperwash, Ont. on Sunday September 20, 2015. Craig Glover/The London Free Press/Postmedia Networ

Warning: Graphic Images 

By Red Power Media, Staff, Updated Sept 20, 2015

The brother of native protester Dudley George, — shot dead by an OPP sniper 20 years ago — was engulfed in flames Sunday during a protest by natives at a disputed former federal military camp.

The Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation last week ratified a deal, that included the return of land appropriated by the federal government in 1942 for use as a military training facility.

But Sunday, during a march to mark the deal’s ratification, a dispute broke out between natives in front of the former Camp Ipperwash, with some residents of the camp erecting a small fire to prevent others from entering.

Pierre George, was engulfed in flames during the standoff.

WARNING GRAPHIC VIDEO: Aboriginal protester accidentally engulfed in flames

Witnesses say Pierre was injured when he accidentally set himself ablaze while pouring gasoline on a fire set by the protesters.

There was still no immediate word on his condition.

The First Nation announced Saturday that it had approved a settlement that included the return of land and $90 million in the dispute over Camp Ipperwash.

RELATED:

About $20 million will be used to compensate original members of Stony Point, their ancestors and eligible band members, while $70 million will be put into a fund overseen by trustees for future development of the original Stony Point reserve.

Dudley George was shot and killed by police when a group of about 30 protesters from the First Nation occupied nearby Ipperwash Provincial Park in September 1995, claiming it contained a sacred burial ground.

Sources:

http://www.lfpress.com/2015/09/20/brother-of-dudley-george-engulfed-in-flames-during-dispute-at-former-camp-ipperwash

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/dudley-george-s-brother-accidentally-set-on-fire-during-ipperwash-protest

Sacred Buffalo Child Stone Blown Up In 1966 For Dam Project Lies Underwater

Video: Search for Buffalo Child Stone

By Black Powder | Red Power Media

The sacred Buffalo Child Stone was blown to pieces with dynamite in 1966 to make way for the South Saskatchewan River Dam Project.

For hundreds of years, the 400-ton rock, —known in Cree as Mistassini (Big Rock)— that resembled a resting buffalo was a sacred meeting place to the Assiniboine and Cree nations.

Despite heroic efforts by First Nations groups to preserve  the Buffalo Child Stone, it was blown up by the Saskatchewan Government and now lies on the floor of Lake Diefenbaker.

Last year, a Saskatoon-based diver, was the first person in nearly 50 years to lay eyes on what remains of the important First Nations’ sacred site.

Neil Fisher, left, and Steven Thair prepare to dive. (Submitted photo/StarPhoenix)

Neil Fisher, left, and Steven Thair prepare to dive. (Submitted photo/StarPhoenix)

Diver, Steven Thair, located the rock at a depth of 21 metres. As he was securing a search line, he lost his balance. When he put his hand out to steady himself, he touched the sharp edge of dynamited rock. He says it is a difficult dive, with visibility at less than 2 metres, with lights.

Tyrone Tootoosis, a member of the Poundmaker Cree Nation, was a part of the discovery team. His father, Wilfred Tootoosis, was one of the elders who fought the destruction of the consecrated site.
 Elder Wilfred Tootoosis stands by Buffalo Child Stone. Photo courtesy of the Saskatchewan Archeological Society.

Elder Wilfred Tootoosis stands by Buffalo Child Stone. Photo courtesy of the Saskatchewan Archeological Society.

In a News Talk article, Thair, recalled how Tyrone, an aboriginal advisor present during the search, said he was honoured to be one of the first people to touch fragments of the stone since it was lost underwater.

“This sacred rock being destroyed, it’s not the first time that’s happened. Now that we are aware of what has happened here in this country in the last 100 some years, we don’t want to see it happen again. I mean, it would be akin to dynamiting Stonehenge because there was going to be a building put there,” Tyrone said.

A remnant of Mistaseni sits on the bottom of Lake Diefenbaker. (Submitted photo/StarPhoenix)

A remnant of Mistaseni sits on the bottom of Lake Diefenbaker. (Submitted photo/StarPhoenix)

Thair said, he does want to tell the story of what happened in 1966, but also he wants to be point out that he doesn’t think it would happen now.

“I don’t think any government would blow the rock up if the circumstances were what they are today, and I don’t think the aboriginal community would stand for it,” he told The Star-Phoenix.

Read more about the Buffalo Child Stone, as told by Barry Ahenakew, an elder of the Ahtahkakoop Cree Nation, to Star-Phoenix reporter Hannah Spray here.

Native American Task Force To Restore Trust, After 2 Homeless Navajo Men Beaten To Death

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By Red Power Media, Staff

It’s been one year since a group of teens beat two homeless Navajo men to death in Albuquerque. A task force has released its recommendations.

When the teens were arrested and charged with the beating deaths, the crime shocked New Mexico.

The incident has prompted city officials to establish a task force to improve life for Native Americans in Albuquerque.

Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry, met with Native American leaders and organized the task force, which focused on homelessness within the Native American population. The task force released its recommendations, but it said trust must be restored.

“A lot of them have a trust for the system. A lot of them don’t have trust in anything, so sometimes they get lost on the streets, and they don’t want to ask for help, because they just don’t trust the system,” said Sherrick Roanhorse, chairman of the task force.

Agencies that interact with the homeless will be learning more about Native culture.

Friday morning, Mayor Berry said the task force has come up with 14 recommendations for the city to follow up on. They include more funding for the “first nation’s community health source”. Officials say $300,000 will help provide more medical care, food and job services.

There will also be an increased focus on mental health issues, emergency housing and “cultural competency training” for all city employees who routinely work with the native population.

All this stems from then deadly beating a year ago on west Central where police say three teens killed two homeless Navajo men for the fun of it using rocks, poles and bricks.

RELATED:

Task force members say they have a lot of work to do.

Officials say with more outreach and education the hope is to spread cultural awareness and prevent further Native American homelessness.

The city says it is also considering building a separate shelter for homeless Native Americans.

Rally For Tina Fontaine Ends With Cousins Wanting A Meeting With Investigators

Video: Justice For Tina Fontaine March

By Black Powder | Red Power Media, Updated: Aug 23, 2015

A one year anniversary rally and march was held in Winnipeg to demand justice for 15 yr old, Tina Fontaine.

On Friday, Tina Fontaine’s cousins and their stepmother, gathered with local indigenous activists and community members at City Hall for a rally, before they marched in the streets to demand justice for Tina.

On Aug 21, 2014, five days after the teen’s body was pulled from the Red River, calls for an inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, were renewed when a protest camp was set up across from the legislative building in Winnipeg.

A handful of indigenous women set up the camp, — calling on the Harper government for an inquiry— that lasted 3 weeks and by the end some 50 tents had went up. The protest camp gained national attention.

Womens Protest Camp Winnipeg Photo: Red Power Media

The womens protest camp for a national inquiry in Winnipeg. (Sept. 2014) File Photo: Red Power Media

One year to the day, the protest continued as some of the same indigenous women and local activists who took part in setting up the camp, also organized a rally and march for Tina and her family.

Cousins of Tina’s including, Katie Fontaine and her sisters Rose and Angel, took part in an emotional rally, where tears streamed down their faces.

Tina Fontaine’s cousins and their mother at an emotional rally at Winnipeg city hall.

Tina Fontaine’s cousins and their stepmother Sarah Courchaine at an emotional City Hall rally. Screenshot: Red Power Media

A group of about 40 activists and community members walked with the cousins from City Hall along Main Street to Portage Avenue then to the Public Safety Building (PBS) where the Winnipeg Police Service is located, to mark the one year anniversary.

Jennifer Spence-Clarke, Left and Sandy Banman, Right, are two of the women organizers from last years protest camp who took part in the march for and rally for Tina Fontaine.

Jennifer Spence-Clarke, left and Sandy Banman, right, are two of the women organizers from last years protest camp who took part in the rally and march for Tina Fontaine.

Many held signs calling for Justice for Tina.

The goal was to once again encourage the federal government to launch an inquiry and pressure local police to provide more information to the Fontaine family about Tina’s unsolved murder.

RELATED:

Katie said the family still isn’t getting any answers from police and no one has been arrested.

Video: No Justice, No Peace for Tina at PSB building

After indigenous activists, along with Tina’s cousins had blocked the doorway of the PBS building, —where chants of No Justice, No Peace yelled out— Red Power Media asked a police officer for an update on Tina Fontaine’s case.

Video: Red Power Media asks the Police for an update on Tina’s ongoing investigation.

Police say investigators will make themselves available to meet with the Fontaine family.

Thelma Favel, Tina’s great aunt who cared for her before she was placed in care of child and family services, has said she wants more information to give her closure and allow her to grieve Tina’s death.

Katie told Red Power Media, that her family now wants to meet with investigators working on Tina’s case, to get answers, to the questions they have.

She also said “It makes me feel good people are still out there, trying to help us get the answers.”

Tina Fontaine

Tina Fontaine