Dakota Access Pipeline Could Start Flowing Oil Within Weeks

This aerial photo shows the Oceti Sakowin camp, where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access pipeline on federal land, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, in Cannon Ball, N.D.

This aerial photo shows the Oceti Sakowin camp, where people have gathered to protest the Dakota Access pipeline on federal land, Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, in Cannon Ball, N.D.

  • Oil could be flowing through the Dakota Access Pipeline in less than two weeks, according to court documents filed by developer Energy Transfer Partners.

By Black Powder | RPM Staff, Feb 24, 2017

The Texas-based company building the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline says oil could be flowing in less than two weeks.

The Washington Times reportsAttorneys for Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) said in a court-ordered status report Thursday that the final 1,100-foot section is nearly finished, which would enable the 1,172-mile, four-state pipeline to begin operations months ahead of previous estimates.

“Dakota Access reports that the pilot hole is complete,” said the report filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court. “The company is currently reaming the hole — i.e., making it larger in order to accept the pipe. As of now, Dakota Access estimates and targets that the pipeline will be complete and ready to flow oil anywhere between the week of March 6, 2017 and April 1, 2017.”

According to The Associated Press, the work under the Missouri River reservoir is the last stretch of the pipeline that will move oil from North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois. ETP got permission for the lake work last month from the pro-energy Trump administration, though Native American tribes continue fighting the project in court.

The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes say the pipeline threatens their drinking water, cultural sites and ability to practice their religion, which depends on pure water.

The tribes have also asked for “meaningful pre-decisional government-to-government consultation.”

This aerial photo provided the Morton County Sheriff's Department shows the closed Dakota Access pipeline protest camp near Cannon Ball, ND, on Thursday. (Uncredited)

This aerial photo provided the Morton County Sheriff’s Department shows the closed Dakota Access pipeline protest camp near Cannon Ball, ND, on Thursday. (Uncredited)

Protesters cleared from camp blocking last section of pipeline

Yesterday, dozens of people were arrested as police in full riot gear cleared the Oceti Sakowin camp where opponents of the Dakota Access pipeline had gathered for the better part of a year.

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About 220 officers and 18 National Guardsmen methodically searched protester tents and other temporary homes for remaining holdouts.

Authorities said they arrested 46 people, including a group of military veterans who had to be carried out and a man who climbed atop a building and stayed there for more than an hour before surrendering.

The arrests occurred a day after the Army Corps of Engineers ordered protesters to clear the camp by a 2 p.m. Wednesday deadline.

Shortly before the Wednesday deadline about 150 people left the camp blocking the last section of pipeline.

Police have made more than 700 arrests since protests began.

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