protesters-roadblock-on-1806-6

Standing Rock Tribal Council Votes for Red Warrior Camp to Leave the Dakota Access Pipeline Protests

protesters-roadblock-on-1806-6

Highway 1806 shut down in both directions by hundreds of people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline

Tribal Council votes 10-0 for Red Warrior Camp to leave

By Red Power Media, Staff | Nov, 19, 2016

Red Warrior Camp, one faction of the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance, has been asked to leave the Standing Rock protests.

APTN News reports, The Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council has voted to oust the Red Warrior camp over the tactics it uses in the field.

The Red Warrior Camp, —labelled by the corporate media as militant anti-pipeline protesters— has been controversial at times because of the protest tactics they use which often involve the breaking of laws.

According to Fox News West Dakota, at a Tribal Council meeting on Nov 1, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council voted 10-0 to ask the Red Warrior Camp to leave the protests.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council Vote 10-0.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council Vote 10-0.

The minutes from the council’s meeting were posted online last week.

The former spokesperson for the Red Warrior Camp, Cody Hall, was quoted as saying that elders were worried that some of the camp members’ messages were becoming increasingly violent, and they questioned whether or not they were concerned for the safety of all the protesters opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline.

At the end of October, the elders raised concerns after destructive actions, including vehicles being set ablaze as authorities evicted protesters from the pipeline company’s property.

The burned hulks of heavy trucks sit on Highway 1806 near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Friday, Oct. 28, near the spot where protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline were evicted from private property a day earlier. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

The burned hulks of heavy trucks sit on Highway 1806 near Cannon Ball, N.D., on Friday, Oct. 28, near the spot where protesters of the Dakota Access pipeline were evicted from private property a day earlier. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

Oct. 31, Hall said he left the camp at the request of his tribe’s elders.

At the time, Frank Archambault, a member of the camp security team at the main Oceti Sakowin Camp where hundreds and sometimes thousands of mostly Native American pipeline opponents have been camping since August, told Forum News Service that tribal elders had asked them to “get a grip” on destructive activity that could overshadow the peaceful and prayerful protest.

“We are not condoning anything like that,” said Archambault, a cousin of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Chairman Dave Archambault II. “We are trying to get a hold of the radicals and get them dismissed.”

Hall had also condemned the vandalism of Dakota Access construction equipment during protest actions.

According to Mint Press News, Militarized riot police raided two frontline camps on Oct. 27, making 107 arrests as they deployed pepper spray, stun guns, and physical force in response to a crowd of unarmed water protectors who were blocking the path of pipeline construction. The water protectors attempted to keep police and pipeline workers from accessing the construction site by setting fires to barricades, but police were able to eventually remove everyone from the frontline camps and reclaim the land.

Gabriella Scarlett, a water protector from Canada, signals for peace as a fire barricade burns off County Road 134. Behind her, water protectors establish a fire barricade to hold police back from the site of construction of the Dakota Access pipeline. Oct. 27, 2016 (Derrick Broze for MintPress)

Gabriella Scarlett, a water protector from Canada, signals for peace as a fire barricade burns off County Road 134. Behind her, water protectors establish a fire barricade to hold police back from the site of construction of the Dakota Access pipeline. Oct. 27, 2016 (Derrick Broze for MintPress)

Hall, while saying that he does not speak for the group, believes the Red Warrior Camp is still present at the camp. Also, he insists that the Tribal Council only wanted to remove the specific segment responsible for the agitation, and that he doesn’t think they wanted the entire camp gone.

Not known is whether the Tribal council has contacted the Red Warrior Camp.

So far, the Red Warrior Camp has shown no sign of exiting, staying active on social media and crowdfunding sites. The camp’s official GoFundMe page had raised about $192,000 as of late Tuesday.

On the #NoDAPL Solidarity website, the Red Warrior Camp is termed as “established in partnership with the Sacred Stone Camp to help guide the nonviolent direct action resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline.”

See the minutes from the Tribal Council meeting HERE.

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