Six Nations Land Claim Dispute Heats Up With New Caledonia Development

 Hamilton Spectator file photo Members of The Haudenosaunee Confederacy want a developer to consult with them on the construction of a massive 3,500 home development on the northern outskirts of Caledonia.


Members of The Haudenosaunee Confederacy want a developer to consult with them on the construction of a massive 3,500 home development on the northern outskirts of Caledonia. Hamilton Spectator file photo.

By Red Power Media, Staff

Another land claims dispute is heating up in Caledonia

Indigenous treaty rights are at the heart of a dispute over plans for a massive subdivision that will bring thousands of new residents to the outskirts of Caledonia.

A notice was sent out by Six Nations ‘Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs saying they are unanimously opposed to a new development.

The developer “Empire Communities” says on its website that its new neighbourhood “Avalon” is coming to Caledonia this March with 3 000 homes on more than 500 acres at McClung road and Haldimand road 66.

There’s already a show home on the site and Six Nations Confederacy Chiefs say they weren’t consulted.

Empire Communities has also barred Six Nations opponents of its Avalon project from the site through a temporary injunction. They wanted no indigenous presence there during the attempted sale of the lots.

Some project opponents plan to fight a permanent injunction when the matter goes to Cayuga court on Jan. 27.

The Ontario Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs wants the developer and Six Nations to hash out the issues.

Six Nations says the province should be negotiating; not the developer

Avalon is just a few kilometres away from the former Douglas Creek Estates.

NATIVE BLOCKADE TOPIX

Six Nations protesters stand on top of their barricade moments before taking it down in Caledonia, Ont. May 23, 2006

In 2006 the same disputed land ignited conflict at the Douglas Creek Estates resulting in First Nations groups occupying the lands, tensions between Six Nations, OPP and Caledonia town residents ran high.

The Douglas Creek Estates was never built.

The Haudenosaunee claim they own the land and the Federal government contends that the land was surrendered in an 1844 treaty.

A lawyer representing the Haudenosaunee Confederacy suggests that if the Province doesn’t halt  construction of the Avalon subdivision so that issues can be resolved, things could escalate quickly.

 

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