Roy Clyde Gets Life In Prison For Shooting 2 Native American Men At Riverton Detox Center

Roy Clyde FREMONT COUNTY DETENTION CENTER / AP

Roy Clyde – FREMONT COUNTY DETENTION CENTER / AP

By Red Power Media, Staff

A Riverton man who previously admitted to shooting two sleeping Native American men at a detox center sentenced to life in prison

The Casper Star‑Tribune reports last Thursday, a judge sentenced Roy Clyde to life in prison without the possibility of parole for shooting and killing 29-year-old Stallone Trosper in July while he slept at a detox center.

Clyde, 32, received a second life sentence for the attempted murder of 50-year-old James “Sonny” Goggles, who was critically injured when Clyde shot him at the center.

Clyde is a former parks worker for the city of Riverton, Wyoming, which lies on the border of the Wind River Indian Reservation. He walked into the Center of Hope detox center last July and shot both men, who were sleeping at the time.

Clyde then unloaded his pistol, walked outside and took off his shirt, then waited for police with his hands held high.

Both of the victims are members of the Northern Arapaho tribe.

Despite Clyde’s denial, it was strongly believed he targeted the two men because they were Native Americans.

Clyde pleaded guilty to the shootings in October to avoid the death penalty.

According to Wyoming Public Media‎, the victims’ families say they are still searching for justice and healing.

The families and Northern Arapaho Business Council have pushed for a federal hate crimes investigation into the attack.

Stallone’s uncle, James Trosper, says his family has felt it important to turn to the values they’ve been taught as Native Americans.

“One of the values that we have is forgiveness,” says Trosper. “I think that we’ve found forgiveness in our hearts, even though it’s difficult. We’re in a place where we’ve turned it over the Creator, and we’re going to let him deal with it the way that he sees fit.”

James Trosper and family say they hope something positive can come from Stallone’s death—like community conversations about centuries-old prejudice.

“That same prejudice that we believe killed Stallone still exists today,” says Trosper. “It’s what my mother experienced when she was a little girl and she would see those signs that said, ‘no Indians and no dogs allowed.’ It exists today. We can’t just leave it in the past and just forget about it. We need to work on it, so that we can get rid of the prejudice that exists and there can be an understanding between our communities.”

Clyde Roy told investigators he had long been considering killing people he referred to as “park rangers.” In Riverton, the term “park rangers” refers to homeless alcoholics — most of them Native Americans — from the surrounding Wind River Indian Reservation. But an arrest affidavit played down any racial motivation, saying that Mr. Clyde was “targeting transient people regardless of race.” 

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2 thoughts on “Roy Clyde Gets Life In Prison For Shooting 2 Native American Men At Riverton Detox Center

  1. Billie Jean Sheshey-Winkekhikes

    I FEEL LIKE JUSTICE HAS BEEN SERVED, NOW IF THE REST OF THE NATION CAN GET IN LINE IT WOULD BE GREAT.

    Like

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