Indigenous Prisoners In ‘Fight Club’ Videos At Mt Eden Correctional Facility

The footage, filmed on a cell phone, appears to show Black Power gang members engaging in organized fights.

The footage, filmed on a cell phone, appears to show Black Power gang members engaging in organized fights.

By Red Power Media, Staff

Shocking videos posted online show Indigenous prisoners in fight clubs.

The footage ―filmed on a smuggled cell phone and posted to YouTube under an account― appears to show Black Power gang members engaging in organized one-on-one combat matches in jail cells and exercise yards.

Black Power’s membership is primarily Māori and Pacific Islander.

In the videos, inmates are seen wearing “SERCO MECF” clothing, which links them to Mt Eden Correctional Facility (MECF) in Auckland, New Zealand.

Large groups of inmates are seen crowding around to watch the bouts and some of the fights last several minutes with no interruption from prison authorities.

Combatants are seen delivering crushing punches and kicks, with some dazed and even knocked out in the vicious bouts.

WARNING GRAPHIC FOOTAGE: The footage, filmed on a cell phone, appears to show Black Power gang members engaging in organized fights.

The Department of Corrections has launched an investigation into how the videos were made and posted online, as cell phones are not allowed in prisons.

Serco director of operations Scott McNairn told ONE News in a statement that fights in prison and the smuggling of phones was illegal and unacceptable.

“I have commissioned a thorough investigation which will examine these incidents. We will work with the Department of Corrections on any necessary actions arising.”

He added Serco was in contact with the police, and the company has implemented additional security measures, while access to the exercise yards have been further limited.

He said 27 mobile phones and 22 SIM cards have been detected so far this year being smuggled into the prison.

WARNING GRAPHIC FOOTAGE: The footage, filmed on a cell phone, appears to show Black Power gang members engaging in organized fights.

Ex-inmate of Mt Eden Corrections Facility says fight clubs are widespread and understaffing is making it worse.

‘Fight back or get the crap kicked out of you’ 

A former inmate says claims of a regular fight club in the jail are true and prisoners have no choice about taking part.

Former inmate ‘Kenny’ phoned in to Newstalk ZB talkback show last week, during a discussion about prison fight clubs.

“Kenny” told Danny Watson “contender” matches happen in just about every unit to sort the weak from the strong.

“I can recount 16 stitches in my head from my second contender match,” the former inmate said.

When you get into these units you don’t have a choice. You either fight back or you get the crap kicked out of you basically.”

Kenny said the problem is a lack of staff as there are only about five guards watching over 120 prisoners.

WARNING GRAPHIC FOOTAGE: The footage, filmed on a cell phone, appears to show Black Power gang members engaging in organized fights.

Corrections is examining its “contractual options” with Serco after “fight club” videos

That announcement came after Corrections Minister Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga said Serco, the private operator of Mt Eden prison, would be held to account after videos of the fights emerged .

Labour’s justice spokeswoman Jacinda Ardern said news of the fight club organized by gang members at Mt Eden prison showed Serco should never have been allowed to run New Zealand prisons.

Serco was understaffing Mt Eden, making it dangerous for staff and prisoners, she said.

“The fact that this has been able to go on for so long and with such organization is horrifying…

“The public will be astounded to see the lack of intervention, but it shouldn’t come as a surprise.”

Serco’s investigation would not stop the string of incidents happening at Mt Eden, she said.

Serco, has been embattled for some time, since mistakenly releasing three prisoners and wrongly detaining three others while another escaped in 2012.

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